Meet One of the Leading Wine Brokers from New Zealand at IBWSS 2017

Wine Brokers NZ began operation in November 2006 and is based in Marlborough, New Zealand. They understand that your business is market led and supply and cash flow are crucial elements to you and your business. They are here to make your life easier. Whether it be bulk wine, grape supply, or packaged product such as clean skins or labelled – they can make your sourcing and trading problems disappear. Professional, prompt, personable, no fuss service. They look forward to working with you.

Wine Brokers New Zealand is a bottled and bulk wine export and brokering company based in Marlborough, New Zealand’s major wine producing region. They also offer full wine making services. They pride themselves on their strong & direct relationships with wine makers & grape growers in the region and throughout the rest of New Zealand.

Services

Wine Brokers NZ deals in wine services and brokering services and base themselves in Marlborough, New Zealand’s major wine producing region. They  pride themselves on their strong & direct relationships with winemakers and grape growers in the region and throughout the rest of New Zealand. Their services encompass a variety of areas of the wine industry from sourcing of grapes through to exporting and shipping of bulk and packaged wines. Browse the options below for a comprehensive list of the services they can provide you. Please contact them if you wish to discuss in further detail how they may be able to help you.

They have a wide range of buyers, both local & international who have on going requirements for New Zealand grapes & bulk wines. If you are looking to sell to help with cash flows or to balance variations between production and current sales levels Wine Brokers NZ can quickly and easily place your products with qualified buyers taking the hassle out of moving surplus stock.

Own Label Services

Wine Sourcing:

Wine Brokers

Increasing the volumes or creating proprietary blends. They can source the wine for your label, blend it and prepare it for bottling or shipping in bulk.

Packaging:

Wine Brokers

Finding competitive supply lines. Bottling & packaging your wine into branded packaging at competitive rates.

Export & Shipment:

Wine Brokers

Wine Brokers NZ can arrange the logistics and paperwork to get your wine to the markets of your choice with the required documentation in a seamless and efficient manner.

Meet and Explore Wine Brokers NZ services at IBWS Show. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Why bulk wine is now so important to the US and global wine market?

Sid Patel, chief executive and founder of Beverage Trade Network and the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show, gives his take on the US bulk wine market in an article that first appeared in Meininger Wine Business International.

Tim Hanni MW, a wine educator and consultant, says the challenge for international producers who want to enter the US market is “learning the intricacies of how bulk wine business is transacted”. Hanni MW, who has helped to  establish the USA’s first bulk wine trade fair, adds that it’s critical to establish “a network of connections to the brokers, buyers and sellers.”

The process starts with understanding how the US bulk wine market operates.

What is bulk wine?

Bulk wine is defined as wine that is shipped in containers (ISO tanks, Flexitanks etc), rather than in bottles or smaller packaging. Some organizations describe any wine that’s shipped in containers larger than two litres as bulk wine but, strictly speaking, bulk wine is wine that’s shipped in large containers and then repackaged at its destination.

Buyers can include wineries, importers, exporters or bottling facilities. Retail stores can also be significant bulk buyers, particularly if they’re selling ‘private label’ wines – the home brand wines created and sold by many liquor retail chains, supermarkets and grocery chain stores. The main advantage that private label wine offers retail chains is that it gives them control over the product, and eliminates the price competition from other retailers.

After all, if they’re the only ones selling that brand of wine, then they don’t face pressure to discount it. Bulk wine is typically traded in the US in one of three ways.

Tier One

The first and most important tier of the US bulk wine trade belongs to wine negociants or brokers. Turrentine Brokerage, Mancuso Wine Brokerage and The Ciatti Company, all based in California, are leading names in this space.

Such brokers offer services ranging from grape and bulk wine brokerage to global bulk wine trading, evaluations and strategic branding. It’s not surprising that San Francisco is the hub of the bulk wine business, both domestically and internationally, given that it’s both within reach of more than 4,000 Californian wineries, as well as being a significant entry point to the US.

Brokerage firms may also offer ‘services as contract manufacturers or private label makers, a part of the business known as ‘custom crush’. This involves a buyer stating the profile of the wine required, which is then made to order by a winery. The buyer usually provides cartons and labels and the winery produces the finished goods.

The brokerage firms offer a great starting point for international bulk producers seeking to enter the US market, given their experience, knowledge and connections.

Tier Two

Wine industry classifieds make up the second strata of the bulk wine business. These classifieds may appear in newspapers, industry publications or online, through websites like winebusiness.com and Wine Country Classifieds (also distributed in print).

The classifieds will list available bulk grapes, or the specifications of ready-made wines, and potential buyers then contact the supplier directly. Many wineries list bulk grapes and wines for sales on their regional association’s website. There are also web portals like VINEX and VinsenVRAC where buyers can negotiate on grape and bulk wine listings.

International producers may certainly list their products through these avenues, as long as they are able to take care of the legalities, logistics and price negotiations themselves.

Tier Three

The third section of the bulk wine trade market is known as the ‘whisper market’, where trade is conducted via personal relationships only. Products are not listed anywhere and nor is transactional data publicly available; nevertheless, this market accounts for a sizeable share of the bulk wine trade.

Insider information is circulated about how many gallons of wine are available for sale at which price, and buyers privy to this knowledge can arrange to taste the product and proceed with the purchase. Wineries can also let brokers know what wines they have for sale, and trust that the brokers will sell the product discreetly, without revealing where it came from.

Similarly, wineries or buyers looking to buy bulk wine can make their exact requirements known to a brokerage firm or negociant, who will then put the buyer in touch with a relevant winery.

This would be a trickier channel to explore for international bulk wine producers, at least until they have spent more time in the market and made deep connections within the network of bulk grape and wine buyers and sellers.

Why bulk wine?

Bulk wine is traded for many reasons, from the need to create a blend using a varietal that’s not available locally, to a need for more wine because of a poor vintage, all the way to private label. On the other side, producers sometimes have excess grapes or wine that they can’t use themselves, and the bulk wine market offers them a way to sell that excess. Wineries – unfortunately – also occasionally find themselves stuck with excess wine because a buyer has failed to make a payment or pick up the stock.

But although there are good reasons why the bulk market exists, there’s also a good reason why the whisper market exists. It’s commonly believed –wrongly – that excess wine is always poor quality. As a result, engaging openly in the bulk wine market has the potential to tarnish the reputation of a winery otherwise known for its award-winning wines.

This scenario presents an opportunity for buyers to procure bulk wines of excellent quality and use them judiciously to build new brands, or flesh out an existing wine portfolio – provided all players can navigate this complex market.

Bulk wine show

That’s why the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show was created in the US – to put buyers and sellers together.

“The IBWSS gives an advantage to international bulk wine buyers and sellers: access to the key players in the bulk wine business for both long- and short-term opportunities with the bonus of educational and informational seminars on important issues and how to expand their business in the US in a single location,” says Tim Hanni MW.

“Attendees and exhibitors can save hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars by having everything, and everyone, in one convenient place.”

The US, whose consumption is estimated at 31m hL, has now broadly established itself as the largest domestic market in the world.

At present, it buys international bulk wines mainly from Argentina, Chile and Canada. But given the growing strength of the US dollar and the emergence of powerful US retailers looking to build private label brands, there is a great opportunity for other countries to make a splash in the market.

France, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of value (29% of the world’s value) and Spain, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of volume (23% of the world’s volume), are wine producing countries with a lot to offer this market, for example.

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Meet Ancient Lake Wine Company at IBWSS

Ancient Lake Wine CompanyAncient Lake Wine Company is a custom-designed facility built to preserve the quality of the grapes. The processing starts with a gentle belt driven receiving system feeding state of the art Bucher presses.

These presses, utilizing the “Organ” system, use fewer pressing cycles to extract optimum juice yields without excessive pressures that will release unwanted phenolic characteristics. From there, juice is sent to their stainless steel tanks, which are all individually insulated creating a micro-climate for each lot of wine produced, allowing them to apply specific techniques (native or non-native fermentations, variable fermentation temperature control, etc.) to each tank.

Additionally, optimum yields are desirable for most of their customers, so they installed a ceramic plated high solids cross-flow filter to capture close to 95% of the product, which protects any non-desirable characteristics that all Diatomaceous Earth filters introduce to the wine. Because of these systems, they are able to provide all customers uniquely sophisticated, vineyard specific, high quality, high yield wines that will be sure to meet and exceed all expectations.

List of services offered by Ancient Lake Wine company –

  • Bulk Wine
  • Custom Crushing
  • Press & Go/Pressing
  • Custom Winemaking
  • Wine Storage
  • Bottling

Ancient Lake Wine CompanyThey are taking  natural products in its prime, and helping it show its maximum potential through the art of winemaking to reach their clients’ goals.  They have a strong passion in allowing the grapes to speak for themselves through the wine, helping consumers identify the region they were grown and the different characteristics each site’s terroir promotes.

In their pursuit for excellence and their client’s success, they take many educated risks to help reach an optimum flavor profile for each block of grapes they process, narrowing down winemaking techniques that are uniquely desirable.  Hence, culminating a structurally balanced, terroir expressive wine which all wine enthusiasts are sure to never forget.

Meet and Explore Ancient Lake Wine Company’s services at IBWS Show. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Explore Wines from the Delicato Family Vineyards at IBWS Show

Delicato Family VineyardsDelicato Family Vineyards is one of the fastest growing wine companies in the world, celebrating 90+ years of California winemaking and grape growing heritage. Family-owned and operated since the company’s founding in 1924, three generations of Indelicato family have fostered the winery’s commitment to innovation, quality and environmental stewardship – cornerstones that have harnessed the family’s long-term focus and solidified the winery as an internationally recognized leader in the industry.

Delicato Family Vineyards

Delicato Family Vineyards offers a portfolio of premium wines from a selection of the most desirable vineyards from notable California wine-growing regions. The winery harvests grapes from Napa, Lodi, Monterey and Sonoma to craft wines that express the diversity of these appellations.

Vineyard selection
Family-owned and farmed vineyards in Napa Valley, Monterey and Lodi.
Farming matched to winemaking objectives and aligned with sustainability.
Grape selection
Their Winemakers and vineyard managers inspect the vineyards throughout entire growing season to determine the optimal time to harvest each varietal by vineyard.
Winemaking
Winemakers complete sensory evaluations before they bottle, after they bottle, during library hold time, prior to release and following bottle age. Wines are bottle aged to ensure that they are delicious at time of purchase
Corks are subject to strict sensory evaluation and grading.

Awards & Accolades

  • 200+ gold/platinum medals over past two years
  • 120 90+ points over  past two years
  • Impact“Hot Brand” Awards, 7 consecutive years
  • Impact“Hot Prospect” Brand Awards, 6 consecutive years
  • Growth Brand Awards, 48 and counting…

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Delicato Family Vineyards has always understood that wine quality starts in the vineyard, and a vineyard is first and foremost a living thing. They will always strive to farm with the health of the environment in mind, while still providing quality wines, mindfully farmed and vinified, for our customers.

Meet and explore their wines and services at IBWS Show in San Francisco, California.  The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

10 Factors to Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner

BTN talks to Steve Dorfman, partner at the Ciatti Company about the 10 Factors That One Should Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner.

Steve joined the Ciatti Company in 2007 after working with the Brown-Forman Corporation, Fetzer Vineyards, Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards and Bolla Wine brands for 24 years. His primary responsibilities are wine and grape sales within California, and the supply demands of markets throughout Europe, Scandinavia and Australia.

Ciatti Company is one of the world’s largest broker of bulk wine, and their services include brokering grapes, evaluating prices from a lot of wine to entire wineries and sourcing both domestic and international concentrate, as well as alcoholic spirits.

With such extensive experience in this industry, we asked him for his insights for buyers looking to get into this business. He mentioned that the buyer should do extensive groundwork to figure out the type of wine they would like to create. With a clear requirement in mind, they will be able to approach bulk suppliers with greater ease.

BTN talks to Steve Dorfman, partner at the Ciatti Company about the 10 Factors That One Should Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner.

1. Know your market: On-Premise or Off-Premise, branded, private label etc.
What is your customer profile? The wine you create will be based on this. Are you looking to create a premium pour? Or a value driver with low profit margins to supply in a national retail chain. An answer to this question will lead you to seek an appropriate supply partner.

2. Know your target customer: Wholesaler, retailer, consumer
These three tiers are all your customers ultimately. Therefore, you must understand the profile of the customer at each tier that you are trying to reach. Will you be placing your brand with a small to medium wholesaler or a large one? Will it be retail chain or a mom-and-pop shop or a supermarket that will house your brands? What is the profile of the end consumer that will be buying your wine? These factors will help you determine the type of wine you require, the margins you will need to keep and lead up to the supplier who can make it for you.

3. Know your plan to go to market: Do you have a brand? Do you have all of your appropriate licenses?
Often, these steps are overlooked and the time and effort underestimated when one sets out to create a brand. Ordering wine from a bulk supplier is only one step in the chain. You need to finalize your brand’s name, SKUs, label designs, carton design, decide whether you will use a cork or bottle cap, file for required licenses. Without these, you will not be ready to go to market.

Continue Reading : 10 Factors to Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner

Bulk wine supply partner

Steve Dorfman, Partner and Broker, The Ciatti Company.
Steve joined the Ciatti Company in 2007 after working with the Brown-Forman Corporation, Fetzer Vineyards, Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards and Bolla Wine brands for 24 years. His primary responsibilities are wine and grape sales within California, and the supply demands of markets throughout Europe, Scandinavia and Australia.

Learn from some of the most influential professional in the beverage industry at the IBWSS conference. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s principal ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. Register now to get lowest pricing.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

ciattiHarvests in Europe are in full swing and the trend is for volumes in line with or below those seen in 2015. Drought in France and Spain has erased talk there of larger harvests than last year; France could be approximately 10% down,Spain in line. There is uncertainty about volumes in Italy,with very early signs that Pinot Grigio could be down as much as 15%. California, meanwhile, is looking at a crop in line with the five-year average and one that won’t soften prices, which are likely to remain where they have been for the past 12-18 months.

South of the equator, Chile and Argentina were visited by very cold temperatures and frosts in early September, causing some concern over damage to the vines and if it means spring, starting in the middle of this month, will see frosts. There is not a huge amount of wine there: generic reds, for example, are short and pricey in Argentina, but when buyers cross the Andes into Chile they are confronted by prices firmer than they would like. International buyers who do not enjoy pre-existing relationships in Chile are arriving to discover they have to pay perhaps as much as 50% more than they were hoping to. Chile’s 2016 harvest was down in volume and quality: grapes for the coming, 2017 harvest are already being purchased and the minimum guaranteed price will be higher than that of 2016.

Cool temperatures in South Africa mean the vines there are having a good winter rest, though much more rain is needed to fill the catchment dams. Statistics suggest a substantial wine stock in South Africa’s cellars by the end of 2016: how much of it is uncontracted? Meanwhile, New Zealand’s exports to the US are a good news story – perhaps too good, considering demand for Sauvignon Blanc is set to continue rising while production expansion in NZ is growing very difficult: supply could be trending very short over the next few years.

california

The harvest in California is in full swing and cooler temperatures at the end of August into September have allowed grapes to size-up a little, helping yield nudge up closer to the five year average, perhaps roughly in line with the 2014 harvest, which was 3.9 million tons. Whites are coming in first, with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir for white wines looking average in volume or just under. At this stage, there are no reports of confirmed smoke taint anywhere in the state; mildew has been successfully fought back. Napa Valley’s 2016 harvest update

Read More : Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

 

The History of Bulk Wine

Wine is probably one of the oldest alcoholic drinks in the history of human kind. Its existence is closely connected to our existence on Earth, evidence of early humans consuming wine dating back to the beginnings of time. The first palpable signs to attest that our ancestors loved wine, is the oldest winery in the world found on the territory of Armenia, dating back to 4100 BC, a site discovered by a team of researchers from UCLA, in 2007. So, wine is around almost since we are, slowly conquering every part of the world. How did wine travel from one corner of the world to another? Wine bottles were not available right away, because we had to invent glass first. Thus, wine was transported in bulk quantities, together with grape vines.

Ancient civilizations, more precisely the Greek, Romans, and Etruscans, used large barrels and amphorae to store and transport wine. This was the way to satisfy the demand for wine, whether wine was being transported by land or ship. These containers for wine were usually large enough to allow men to handle them by hand, since there were no cranes to help them out. It was not the bottle of wine that appeared first, rather the wine barrel being the first to mark wine’s history. Of course, smaller vessels, usually made out of ceramic, were used to serve wine on the table. The tradition of bulk wine continued to the Medieval Times. Even fine assortments of wine like Burgundy and Bordeaux started out in bulk quantities. Still, this practice almost came to the verge of extinction, when bottled wine appeared. It was Chateau Mouton Rothschild that started this revolution back in 1924, bringing to the market glass that was reliable and affordable. It was believed that the characteristics of the wine bottle reflected the quality and authenticity of a particular wine.

The practice of bottling fine varieties of wine continued, and it remains a practice even today, the estate bottle becoming the standard for all quality wines. But even so, bulk wine did not disappear, remaining an important mechanism in the demand and supply scheme on the market. It may be true that some people love to buy and collect fine wine editions, keeping special wine in bottles, as a sign that the particular wine is not a regular, every day wine.

A great benefit of bulk wine is the fact that it can access new markets. Let’s take the Scandinavian market, for instance, where the bag-in-box formats, with a capacity of 3 liters, are extremely popular. This market also has a minimum shelf life for wines that makes them impossible to be packed in this manner at their source. It is a much preferred packaging version that does not uses glass.Other alternatives used are tetra-packs, pouches and PET containers.

There are many factors that make bulk wine an attractive option. During shipping, for instance, bulk wine has a much better thermal inertia than wine that is packed in glass bottles. Thermal inertia implies keeping the wine at an optimum temperature without exposing the liquid to wide thermal variations. When wine is transported from the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere, the temperatures vary greatly, which can lead to changes in the properties of the wine. Bulk wine is subjected to temperature increases of 10 to 15 degrees celsius, compared to bottled wine which can sometimes exceed variations of 60 degrees celsius. Such significant changes in temperature can last for weeks, till the wine reaches the destination and is placed in adequate conditions.

What are the changes that can occur in wine when it is subjected to higher temperatures than recommended, for several days in a row? The longer the wine is kept under these conditions, the higher are the chances for it to be oxidized. Wine will age in an accelerated fashion, the fruit bouquet will be lost, premature browning can occur, and the levels of sulphur dioxide that protect the wine can decrease considerably.

In this day and age, wine is transported in staggering quantities at once and it is still provided on the market in bulk packages that are not made out of glass. To make wine transportation over large distances efficient, huge cargo containers of approximately 24,000 liters are used.

Spain is the largest producer and seller of bulk wine, followed by France and Italy. The Spanish wine producers managed to export 22.8m hectoliters back in 2014, recording a 22% rise of exported wine over the previous year. France, on the other hand, prefers importing wine more than producing it, purchasing bulk wine from Spain. The French imported no less than 5.8m hectoliters in 2014, which means that they increased importers to 40% more than the previous year. Germany, Portugal, and Russia follow France on the list of most important buyers of Spanish bulk wine.

Spain should look out for Italy, as it is coming strong from behind when it comes to bulk wine. The market it this country in this sector has changed significantly over the past years, in terms of price and final destination market places. In 2015, Italy managed to produce slightly more wine than Spain, recording a harvest of 49 ml. hectoliters, while Spain had just 41. Still, not only the quantity but also the quality of bulk wine coming from Italy helped them gain market. The Italians provided white wines of acceptable quality and red wines of exceptional quality. Other important players in the bulk wine market are Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and California, USA. These last mentioned countries are active in the southern hemisphere of the globe, although their wines can be found all over the world. An increase in the prices of Chilean and Argentinean bulk wine is forecasted, but this may not happen if the producers manage to secure the necessary harvest in the end.

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Insight into the Changing Supply Dynamics of the Wine Business

by Turrentine Brokerage

Novato, CA – The Turrentine Brokerage team is proud to announce the release of Issue 16 of The Turrentine Outlook: Forecasts and Strategies for a Competitive Advantage©.

The information in The Turrentine Outlook sets a foundation that illustrates the long-term cycles of the market, and is designed to be supplemented with specific advice and strategy for your individual situation. This publication draws upon Turrentine Brokerage’s real world experience and unique supply data to analyze changes in supply and demand for eight key varietals in the major regions across California and internationally. The report also suggests strategy options for a competitive advantage.
Highlights in this issue include:
• The potential impacts on the wine and grape markets from:
o The increased volume of wines and grapes sourced from northern interior to compete on store shelves above $10.00 per bottle
o Consolidation and distribution
o Land use restrictions and accessibility to water
• Factors strengthening the market and those weakening the market
• Supply and demand driven analysis for Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot Grigio, Zinfandel, Petite Sirah and Muscat varieties

Excerpt from Central Coast Chardonnay

“Grapes from the Central Coast, including Crush Districts 6, 7 and 8, account for roughly 25% of the Chardonnay crushed in California and are extremely important because they supply brands covering the full spectrum of price points. The 2015 crop was 31% below 2014, bringing inventories much more into balance in the short-term. The market for 2016 grapes was more active early in the year, especially in the cooler regions of Monterey County and Santa Barbara County. The bulk market was also more active than in the previous three years.

The current perception of the 2016 crop is for an average crop with early projections based on counts of two clusters per shoot; however, there are singles out there as well. The winter of 2015-2016 provided more water than in recent years, and should be enough to properly farm throughout the 2016 growing season. In the long-term, the political effects from the drought have resulted in increased farming regulations, leading to even more scrutiny on water use, increased farming and development costs, and delays.

It seems likely that consumer demand will continue growing at a healthy clip from $8.00 up to $15.00 per bottle. The competition for consumers purchases in this price-point, however, will also be strong. In particular, it is hard to predict the outcome of the continued and concerted efforts to use more northern interior Chardonnay grapes and wine in order to supply a larger percentage of the Chardonnay sold in this price range. With this competitive development, it is difficult to know if the production of Central Coast grapes as well as the production of Chardonnay from competing regions will surge ahead of demand or if growing demand will match, or even exceed, the growth in supply. Growers will want to redouble their work on quality to help justify the premium paid for cool region Central Coast Chardonnay while still keeping control of costs. Brand owners will want to keep tinkering with the puzzle of how to best deliver stupendous perceived quality to the consumer at a highly competitive price.

The Turrentine Outlook©

The Turrentine Outlook is produced by a team of wine industry veterans with an understanding of both strategic and tactical actions necessary to capture a competitive advantage in the marketplace. This report draws upon a robust pool of information, both proprietary and public, that has been refined and corrected in accordance with expert opinion and real world practice.

The Turrentine Outlook delivers data snapshots for eight key varieties by region and forward looking analysis that are not available anywhere else, thus shedding a revealing light on supply dynamics.
Supply and demand is analyzed with the help of multiple graphs including: bearing vs. non-bearing acres and tons crushed, spot market versus district average grape prices, bulk wine availability, collateral values of wines in bulk, tons and values of grapes grown by district, international pricing and estimated price per gallon landed in California duty paid, and Turrentine Wheel dynamics for each variety at various price points.

About Turrentine Brokerage

Turrentine Brokerage, founded in 1973, serves as a trusted and strategic advisor to growers, wineries, and financiers, specializing in the strategic sourcing of wine grapes and bulk wine from the major growing areas across the globe. Working with thousands of wineries worldwide, and with over 2,000 growers, this experienced team has negotiated transactions between buyers and sellers valued at more than $2 billion over the last decade. Widely recognized as the leading expert in wine business supply cycles, Turrentine Brokerage provides unique insight into the complex market dynamics that can make or break growers, brands, and financiers.
Contact

To subscribe to The Turrentine Outlook, please visit www.turrentineoutlook.com. For more information, please call Steve Fredricks or Daniel Tugaw.

Steve Fredricks President (415) 209-9463
Daniel Tugaw Market Researcher & Analyst (415) 209-9463

Steve Fredricks is also a keynote speaker at the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.