Discover Unique Quality Wines from Boland Cellar at IBWSS 2017

Boland Cellar is a regional specialist with a long history of producing internationally-acclaimed wines.

From its humble origins, Boland has grown over 75 years to become an international producer of fine wine, competing on a global scale. Extensive prime vineyards across the Cape Coastal Region guarantee consistency in style and quality year after year, which, with collaboration, dedication and expertise, have led Boland Cellar to become one of South Africa’s top wine brands.

Boland Cellar

They are the most recent in our 40-year legacy of international wine awards and trophies here.

The captivating history of Boland Cellar in Paarl dates back to the late 1930s and the early 1940s.

In 1939 some 40 wine farmers of the Boland region came together to begin collectively were pressing their grapes. Soon their joint production was too large for the existing facilities to handle and the group broke up, at which point nine bold farmers from the Paarl area, determined to continue their collaboration, decided to head out on their own and took the courageous step of forming their own winery on 17 June, 1941. Today, that winery is known as Boland Cellar.

Their growing partners’ vineyards cover approximately 1,900 hectares (almost 4,700 acres) in area across the Cape Coastal Region – from Paarl and Malmesbury to Durbanville and the Berg River Valley. The variations in terroir and climate across these areas create regional expressions of each varietal, giving their dynamic and award-winning winemaking team the opportunity to create wines of both high quality and distinctive character.

The Cape Coastal Region is unique in its myriad of different terroir and climatic zones, producing some of the finest expressions of the varietals grown. Through collaboration with different growers across this region, Boland Cellar brings together grapes from a variety of different climatic zones, and blends them with their knowledge of the region and our wine-making expertise to create exceptional wine.

Boland Cellar

Among the climatic zones we draw on are the Paardeberg and its surrounds, well-known for producing exceptional Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc and Shiraz; the Drakenstein Mountain Slopes, which have lower yields, but very high quality grapes; the Swartland Border Area, which traditionally produces grain, but is now also renowned for its robust, full-bodied Pinotage and Shiraz; the coastal areas, ideal for Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, and lastly the Berg River Valley, which favours white varietals, and consistently delivers a high quality harvest year after year.

Boland Cellar has been lauded as one of Paarl’s most progressive cellars, and we constantly strive to meet international accreditation standards.

Boland is IPW and HACCP accredited and has BRC accreditation through its bottling facilities. Boland Cellar is a shareholder in its bottling facility and is therefore able to ensure strict adherence to international quality assurance standards.

Boland Cellar also obtained full WIETA accreditation in 2016.

Wines Inspired by Nature

Great wine is not determined by a single element. It’s not just the terroir, with its soil and its rocks. It’s not just the summer sun, or winter’s chill. Each grape is the result of the collaboration between nature’s different elements – elements that shift and change and can prove fickle, but can also produce greatness. Like nature, Boland Cellar has chosen to work together with farmers and growers across a broad range of climates and terroir, taking the collaboration that was begun by each vine all the way to your glass.

Pioneers of Boland Cellar

The idea and spirit of collaboration has inspired Boland Cellar since its founding, and we are proud to have remained pioneers of collaboration in the South African wine industry for more than 75 years.

History is filled with great collaborations. They have changed the face of culture and technology, of music and art. Through it we are able to create something better, something that no individual could have created alone.

Since Boland Cellar’s formation in 1941, their ethos of collaboration has been at the heart of everything we do. The exceptional quality, style, consistency and service we offer is built on working together with growers, employees and suppliers, talented winemakers, and, of course, nature. Together, we are able to craft outstanding wine for our loyal customers.

Meet and Explore Boland Cellar at IBWS Show. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

How to Have Your Own Wine Label Without Having a Winery

On the surface, it almost sounds like an oxymoron – having your own wine label without having a winery. But private label wines are becoming an increasingly popular segment of the U.S. wine market, and for good reason: launching your own private label wine can boost revenue, increase profit margins, and help you create a unique brand identity that sets you apart from the competition.

Perhaps the best example of a private label wine business taking off is the Kirkland Signature line of wines at Costco, which is already the #1 wine retailer in the U.S. Through its exclusive partnerships with wineries in the United States, Costco is able to offer unique, premium wines at half the cost anywhere else. Similarly, Trader Joe’s has sold over 50 million cases of its private label wine since 2002.

And a growing number of retailers – including some national wine and liquor chains and supermarkets – are following suit, viewing the private label wine business as a way to boost revenue and grow margins. According to some estimates, the margins on private label wine bottles are 10-15 percent higher than on bottles from national brands like Kendall Jackson and Barefoot.

Plus, as wine experts point out, retailers are essentially shortening their supply chain by squeezing out some of the middleman who are making their mark-ups every time they sell a case of wine. You are getting your wine direct from the winery, after all.

As a result, it’s no longer out of the ordinary to see private label wines show up on the shelves of supermarkets. Even a few national wine and spirits stores, such as Total Wine, now offer private label wines. According to the current estimates, private label wines now account for approximately 5 percent of all wines sold in the United States, and that figure could be headed higher. Some projections call for private label wines to eventually account for 20 percent of the entire market.

That would make private label wines roughly the equivalent of other private label goods (i.e. private label pasta, private label canned goods) that supermarkets now sell. And in France and Italy, the private label wine market is even more popular, accounting for nearly one-third of all wines sold.

In addition to the economic appeal of these private label wines, there’s also the branding aspect that can help to differentiate companies from other restaurants or retailers. For example, the legendary Italian restaurant Carmine’s in New York City has used private label wines as part of its overall branding strategy. It has worked with wineries to create a range of different wines – Pinot Grigio, Chianti, Prosecco, Montepulciano and Trebbiano – that it can offer to customers as examples of small, family-made wines, which can be enjoyed as part of a family-style feast. For families and tourists on a budget, it’s a way to create a welcoming wine menu that is also true to the restaurant’s overall brand.

The important point to keep in mind is that a private label wine doesn’t say “private label” on the bottle. To the casual wine drinker, it looks just like any other wine they might drink. While Costco and Trader Joe’s customers may realize they are drinking private label wines, that’s not necessarily true in the restaurant and hospitality business.

In general, private label wines are starting to catch on as customers become more adventurous and daring in their choices. They may not recognize the wine or the label, but are tempted to try it and experiment. And, as we’ve seen already, having an eye-catching label is often just as effective as having a first-class wine in terms of attracting attention. The “snob appeal” of avoiding private label wines, if there ever was any, appears to be fading. After all, the bottle, the cork, and the label are no different. It’s just a matter of convincing a customer to try a $10-15 bottle of wine they may not recognize instead of a bottle of wine that’s 2-3 times more expensive.

If anything, the major trend is towards private, exclusive wines that are grown in limited quantities. So that’s how businesses can choose to position their private label wines. Instead of being used to attract cost-conscious customers, it’s a way to attract affluent, sophisticated customers. That may not be true for Costco, which is focused on selling huge quantities at low prices, but it certain works for the hospitality business, where there is a constant search to differentiate oneself from the competition. As a result, everyone from a national chain of steakhouses to a small boutique hotel chain might be interested in creating a private label wine.

Bottles of white wine in a bottling plant

Which leads to the obvious question: How do you get started if you want to own your own private label?

The first step, say industry insiders, is to figure out the types of wines that your customers enjoy drinking and what the average price of the bottles they are ordering is. From there, you need to make a few projections about the growth projections of your business. You don’t want to be ordering thousands of cases of wine, and then be stuck with dead inventory. Also, since every label must denote the place of origin of the wine, the wines you select should be a natural fit for the restaurant in terms of region and style of wine.

From there, it’s time to reach out to wineries that might potentially be interested in a deal. Some wineries are able to accommodate a wide range of order sizes – everything from 5 cases to 1000 cases – while other wineries prefer only to work on smaller or larger order sizes. Once you’ve narrowed down your choices, the vintner will work with you on every aspect of creating your own wine – down to the creation of the label and even the type of cork. There are also independent design companies specializing in designing wine labels, cases and other promotional material. They will design a label that meets the specifications of the country you want to sell in and the tier you want to sell the wine in.

From there, all you have to do is place the order and you’ll soon have your private wine label, all without the time and expense of actually operating your own winery.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.