What are the rules for transfer of unlabelled bottled wine?

When unlabeled bottled wine is transferred among two or more bonded wine premises for aging or labeling, the bottler must provide a copy of the approved Application For And Certification/Exemption of Label/Bottle Approval (COLA) TTB Form 5100.31 under which the wine was bottled. The transfer in bond record which accompanies the wine must be accurate and specific, and the label information record for the wine must fully support any claims made on the label to be affixed to the wine.

The responsibility for transferring accurate label information is not that of the producer alone; it is the responsibility of all holders of the wine from the time it is produced until it is removed from bond for consumption or sale.

Here are guidelines for the various parties that may be involved when unlabeled bottled wine is transferred among bonded premises:

What are the responsibilities of the Producer?

The producer of the wine must ensure that the transfer in bond record required by 27 CFR 24.309 contains accurate and specific label information for all bulk wine shipped in bond (or tax paid) to another premises for bottling. This allows the bottler to apply for a COLA and ensures that the product label is correct.

What are the responsibilities of the Bottler?

The bottler obtains a COLA which can be substantiated by the transfer record which accompanied the wine from the producer. Unless the wine will be bottled at a tax paid wine bottling house, the bottler will make sure that the wine to be bottled is received and maintained on bonded (not tax paid) premises. The bottler maintains records in accordance with 27 CFR 24.308.

If the bottler transfers unlabeled bottled wine to another bonded premises for labeling, the bottler must send the wine in bond (untaxpaid) with the COLA under which the wine was bottled. If a different product label will be affixed, the bottler must obtain a correct COLA, and forward it to the premises where the label will be affixed. The transfer in bond record that accompanies the bottled wine must contain accurate and specific information which substantiates the product label, as specified by 27 CFR 24.309. However, if unlabeled bottled wine is transferred to another bonded premises for aging only, and will be subsequently returned to the bottler for the affixing of the product label, the COLA does not have to accompany the shipments.

To reiterate, an approved label which accompanies the wine must carry the minimum label requirements, but it might not be the label eventually affixed to the product. The label used to bottle the wine is sometimes referred to as the “generic” label. The bottler may apply for another COLA for a product label with specific label claims, as long as the claims are substantiated by the label information record requirements of 27 CFR 24.314.

What does the Labeller receive from the Bottler?

The person who will affix the product label receives the unlabeled, untaxpaid bottled wine, the COLA for the product label to be affixed, and the transfer in bond record (27 CFR 24.309) which contains accurate and specific information which substantiates the label claims.

Only the bottler of the wine may apply for a COLA. If the owner of unlabeled bottled wine wants to label the wine with a label other than that which accompanied the wine, the bottler must be contacted, and the bottler must work with the owner to obtain an approved product label which is fully substantiated by the label information record for that wine.

What if the bottler is unable to provide a COLA?

If the bottler of the wine is unable to obtain label approval for the wine to be labelled, the wine may only be labeled if it is dumped to bulk and re-bottled. It may be re-bottled when an appropriate COLA is obtained by the bottler. The label may not contain any information which is not fully supported by the label information record for the wine.

Red wine in glass bottling machine at winery

What is the responsibility of the person who removes the wine from bond?

If the labelled wine is transferred in bond to another bonded wine premises for taxable removal, it must be accompanied by the transfer in bond record (27 CFR 24.309) which contains accurate and specific information which substantiates the label claims.

The person who pays the tax on the wine is the qualified proprietor of a bonded winery or bonded wine cellar, and not a wholesaler, wine broker, agent, negotiate, retailer, consumer or, necessarily, the actual owner of the wine. Bottled wine may not be removed from bond (i.e., tax paid) without a COLA and an approved product label being affixed. This requirement is given in the wine regulations at 27 CFR 24.257(a) which states in part: “The proprietor must label each bottle or other container of beverage wine prior to removal for consumption or sale.”

How long the records must be kept?

All records must be retained for a period of not less than three years from the record date or the date of last entry required to be made in the record, whichever is later.

However, TTB may require records to be kept for a period of not more than three additional years, if deemed necessary.

Source: https://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-faq.shtml

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Bulk Wine, Bulk Spirits and Private Label Show Comes To Europe in 2018

International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) which is an annual show in San Francisco that caters to the US bulk wine, bulk spirits and private label buyers now also comes to London. IBWSS London will be an annual event exhibiting global bulk wine, bulk spirits and private label service providers. The IBWSS London will give European supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and other buyers an opportunity to source bulk wine and spirits in one place, and meet private label suppliers.

Event Date: Jan 24-25, 2018

Location: The Royal Horticultural Halls Lindley Hall, London

Bulk Wine - IBWSShow London - 2018

“The bulk segment holds the largest market share in the wine and spirits industry,” said Sid Patel, CEO of Beverage Trade Network.  “Bulk trading is an age-old trade between producers, but we are now seeing the business take on a very impressive position across the industry. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show aims to give the bulk trade a truly dynamic trading platform where buyers can confidently conduct business with the world’s most reputable suppliers.”

As the central exchange for European trade, London is positioned perfectly for the fair. The city has long acted as the European trading post between the northern and southern hemispheres.  With the launch of IBWSS, international bulk suppliers from some of the world’s most important markets will have unprecedented access to the European market.

Registration for The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show will open to all international suppliers on March 1, 2017. IBWSS London is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network.

For more information, press releases and launch discount for exhibitors, please fill out interest form here: https://goo.gl/forms/zrHJ8461hV0ZFRi32

About Beverage Trade Network

Beverage Trade Network (BTN) is a leading online marketing and B2B networking platform servicing suppliers, buyers and beverage professionals in the global beverage industry. BTN provides a selection of sourcing solutions for importers and distributors as well as an extensive range of marketing and distribution services for international suppliers. BTN also runs a line-up of b2b trade shows around the world. For more information about BTN, please visit www.beveragetradenetwork.com

About The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference, open to trade professionals only, that takes place takes place in London, UK and San Francisco, CA. IBWSS exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing / private label programs and wineries / distilleries / importers who have one time excess stock to clear. IBWSS buyers are other wineries and distilleries looking to meet up their demand, Importers, Retailers and Distributors looking for private label programs, negociants who are looking to meet the growers and producers.

2018 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show – Exhibitor Registration (London) Now Open Register Today!

Why bulk wine is now so important to the US and global wine market?

Sid Patel, chief executive and founder of Beverage Trade Network and the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show, gives his take on the US bulk wine market in an article that first appeared in Meininger Wine Business International.

Tim Hanni MW, a wine educator and consultant, says the challenge for international producers who want to enter the US market is “learning the intricacies of how bulk wine business is transacted”. Hanni MW, who has helped to  establish the USA’s first bulk wine trade fair, adds that it’s critical to establish “a network of connections to the brokers, buyers and sellers.”

The process starts with understanding how the US bulk wine market operates.

What is bulk wine?

Bulk wine is defined as wine that is shipped in containers (ISO tanks, Flexitanks etc), rather than in bottles or smaller packaging. Some organizations describe any wine that’s shipped in containers larger than two litres as bulk wine but, strictly speaking, bulk wine is wine that’s shipped in large containers and then repackaged at its destination.

Buyers can include wineries, importers, exporters or bottling facilities. Retail stores can also be significant bulk buyers, particularly if they’re selling ‘private label’ wines – the home brand wines created and sold by many liquor retail chains, supermarkets and grocery chain stores. The main advantage that private label wine offers retail chains is that it gives them control over the product, and eliminates the price competition from other retailers.

After all, if they’re the only ones selling that brand of wine, then they don’t face pressure to discount it. Bulk wine is typically traded in the US in one of three ways.

Tier One

The first and most important tier of the US bulk wine trade belongs to wine negociants or brokers. Turrentine Brokerage, Mancuso Wine Brokerage and The Ciatti Company, all based in California, are leading names in this space.

Such brokers offer services ranging from grape and bulk wine brokerage to global bulk wine trading, evaluations and strategic branding. It’s not surprising that San Francisco is the hub of the bulk wine business, both domestically and internationally, given that it’s both within reach of more than 4,000 Californian wineries, as well as being a significant entry point to the US.

Brokerage firms may also offer ‘services as contract manufacturers or private label makers, a part of the business known as ‘custom crush’. This involves a buyer stating the profile of the wine required, which is then made to order by a winery. The buyer usually provides cartons and labels and the winery produces the finished goods.

The brokerage firms offer a great starting point for international bulk producers seeking to enter the US market, given their experience, knowledge and connections.

Tier Two

Wine industry classifieds make up the second strata of the bulk wine business. These classifieds may appear in newspapers, industry publications or online, through websites like winebusiness.com and Wine Country Classifieds (also distributed in print).

The classifieds will list available bulk grapes, or the specifications of ready-made wines, and potential buyers then contact the supplier directly. Many wineries list bulk grapes and wines for sales on their regional association’s website. There are also web portals like VINEX and VinsenVRAC where buyers can negotiate on grape and bulk wine listings.

International producers may certainly list their products through these avenues, as long as they are able to take care of the legalities, logistics and price negotiations themselves.

Tier Three

The third section of the bulk wine trade market is known as the ‘whisper market’, where trade is conducted via personal relationships only. Products are not listed anywhere and nor is transactional data publicly available; nevertheless, this market accounts for a sizeable share of the bulk wine trade.

Insider information is circulated about how many gallons of wine are available for sale at which price, and buyers privy to this knowledge can arrange to taste the product and proceed with the purchase. Wineries can also let brokers know what wines they have for sale, and trust that the brokers will sell the product discreetly, without revealing where it came from.

Similarly, wineries or buyers looking to buy bulk wine can make their exact requirements known to a brokerage firm or negociant, who will then put the buyer in touch with a relevant winery.

This would be a trickier channel to explore for international bulk wine producers, at least until they have spent more time in the market and made deep connections within the network of bulk grape and wine buyers and sellers.

Why bulk wine?

Bulk wine is traded for many reasons, from the need to create a blend using a varietal that’s not available locally, to a need for more wine because of a poor vintage, all the way to private label. On the other side, producers sometimes have excess grapes or wine that they can’t use themselves, and the bulk wine market offers them a way to sell that excess. Wineries – unfortunately – also occasionally find themselves stuck with excess wine because a buyer has failed to make a payment or pick up the stock.

But although there are good reasons why the bulk market exists, there’s also a good reason why the whisper market exists. It’s commonly believed –wrongly – that excess wine is always poor quality. As a result, engaging openly in the bulk wine market has the potential to tarnish the reputation of a winery otherwise known for its award-winning wines.

This scenario presents an opportunity for buyers to procure bulk wines of excellent quality and use them judiciously to build new brands, or flesh out an existing wine portfolio – provided all players can navigate this complex market.

Bulk wine show

That’s why the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show was created in the US – to put buyers and sellers together.

“The IBWSS gives an advantage to international bulk wine buyers and sellers: access to the key players in the bulk wine business for both long- and short-term opportunities with the bonus of educational and informational seminars on important issues and how to expand their business in the US in a single location,” says Tim Hanni MW.

“Attendees and exhibitors can save hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars by having everything, and everyone, in one convenient place.”

The US, whose consumption is estimated at 31m hL, has now broadly established itself as the largest domestic market in the world.

At present, it buys international bulk wines mainly from Argentina, Chile and Canada. But given the growing strength of the US dollar and the emergence of powerful US retailers looking to build private label brands, there is a great opportunity for other countries to make a splash in the market.

France, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of value (29% of the world’s value) and Spain, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of volume (23% of the world’s volume), are wine producing countries with a lot to offer this market, for example.

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

ciattiHarvests in Europe are in full swing and the trend is for volumes in line with or below those seen in 2015. Drought in France and Spain has erased talk there of larger harvests than last year; France could be approximately 10% down,Spain in line. There is uncertainty about volumes in Italy,with very early signs that Pinot Grigio could be down as much as 15%. California, meanwhile, is looking at a crop in line with the five-year average and one that won’t soften prices, which are likely to remain where they have been for the past 12-18 months.

South of the equator, Chile and Argentina were visited by very cold temperatures and frosts in early September, causing some concern over damage to the vines and if it means spring, starting in the middle of this month, will see frosts. There is not a huge amount of wine there: generic reds, for example, are short and pricey in Argentina, but when buyers cross the Andes into Chile they are confronted by prices firmer than they would like. International buyers who do not enjoy pre-existing relationships in Chile are arriving to discover they have to pay perhaps as much as 50% more than they were hoping to. Chile’s 2016 harvest was down in volume and quality: grapes for the coming, 2017 harvest are already being purchased and the minimum guaranteed price will be higher than that of 2016.

Cool temperatures in South Africa mean the vines there are having a good winter rest, though much more rain is needed to fill the catchment dams. Statistics suggest a substantial wine stock in South Africa’s cellars by the end of 2016: how much of it is uncontracted? Meanwhile, New Zealand’s exports to the US are a good news story – perhaps too good, considering demand for Sauvignon Blanc is set to continue rising while production expansion in NZ is growing very difficult: supply could be trending very short over the next few years.

california

The harvest in California is in full swing and cooler temperatures at the end of August into September have allowed grapes to size-up a little, helping yield nudge up closer to the five year average, perhaps roughly in line with the 2014 harvest, which was 3.9 million tons. Whites are coming in first, with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir for white wines looking average in volume or just under. At this stage, there are no reports of confirmed smoke taint anywhere in the state; mildew has been successfully fought back. Napa Valley’s 2016 harvest update

Read More : Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

 

New Zealand wine rewarded for Diversity at international competition

New zealand winesResults released today by one of the world’s most prestigious wine competitions are a testament to the rising quality and diversity of New Zealand wines. New Zealand wines beat entries from around the world to win the top Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc Trophies at the 2016 International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC), based in the U.K. This year, New Zealand wines were also awarded Gold Medals for styles ranging from sweet Riesling to Syrah, Gewürztraminer to Malbec.

For another year running, New Zealand retained possession of the Pinot Noir Trophy,awarded in 2016 to the Giesen Single Vineyard Ridge Block Marlborough Pinot Noir 2013. New Zealand also scooped the Sauvignon Blanc Trophy with the Kim Crawford Small Parcels Spitfire Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2016.

New Zealand wine showed it could excel with other styles and varieties on the world-stage by winning top awards for a spectrum of Riesling styles, and a Chardonnay and Gewürztraminer in the whites, and a Syrah, Merlot Cabernet and Malbec in the reds.

“New Zealand has established itself as a world-beater in Sauvignon Blanc, and more recently Pinot Noir,” commented Jo Burzynska, a long time IWSC judge and a New Zealand panel chair. “However, in all the years that I’ve been judging at the IWSC, this is one if the widest range of styles I’ve witnessed winning top awards.”

“We are delighted with the results New Zealand wines achieved at IWSC this year. It’s great see a continued focus on premium Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir, as well recognition of the quality coming from a wide range of other up and coming New Zealand wine styles and varieties.” said Chris Yorke, Global Marketing Director for New Zealand Winegrowers.

For further information please contact:
Chris Yorke
Global Marketing Director
New Zealand Winegrowers
Tel: 09 306 5551
Mob: 021 419194
Email: chris@nzwine.com

Source : NZ wine

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Tesco Strengthens Own Label Wine Range

TescoTesco has boosted its own label range with the introduction of more than 20 new lines under its core and premium finest* wine range – which it says has seen “significant” growth over the summer.

The team has rolled out 39 new wines in total – twenty-two of which are own-label – with a further twelve available exclusively online. The move follows the revamp of 118 wines in its own label range in June, which saw it ditch the “confusing” ‘Vineyards World Wines’ and ‘Simply’ sub-brands, and move six wines previously available under the finest* range to the standard own label.

Tesco BWS team said the its wines has grown 2.9% since the revamp and it had seen a “significant increase” in the number of new customers and returning customers”.

However the move appears contrary to supplier research believed to be presented to the retailer over the summer which suggested Tesco had stripped out too many wines at the premium end during its range review last year, alienating a core section of its 40-something, middle-class customer-base.

The Drink Business team has learnt the retailer had called in suppliers to investigate boosting its £8-20 range bracket to plug the potential gap – but of the new additions to its store-range, only four (including a new finest* English sparkling from producer Hush Heath) retail above £10. Ten will retail on or below £5.50 with a further seven at the £6 – £6.99 ‘sweet spot’ and six retail between £7 – £8.99. A further twelve new wines are available exclusively online, priced from £54 and £120 per case (equivalent to £9-£20 per bottle).

Product development manager Graham Nash said the team’s simplification of the own label range had made it easier for consumers due to clear labeling and pricing. “Evolution is very much to get the own label tiering – [the range] is always evolving to cater for customers’ needs. As lot work done in the last year was in establishing a core range.

Read more at: The Drinks Business

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

10 Innovative Wine Apps and Websites That Can Help You Grow Your Winery Business

The wine industry is finally getting on board with technology and now there are wine apps available that make it easier for brands to cultivate connections, reach customers and gain insights on buying trends- all while promoting their own brand. Tapping into thriving social media communities can help you cultivate those connections by drawing out wine influencers.

Instagram. The premise of this platform is simple: users share images. With over 300 million users there are plenty of well-educated and socially engaged customers. Browsing wine related #hashtags exposes a wide variety of  wine centered photos that even include reviews.

Twitter. The beauty of Twitter is that is allows you to check #hashtags for wine related chats. You can jump in on #SommDay or #ChardonnayDay and engage with an audience that is already interested in what you have to say, and full of wine influencers.

Facebook. While it is more difficult to gain attention using Facebook, you have a platform that allows you to communicate in long-form. It’s an excellent way to cultivate long-term relationships with customers and really engage in interested individuals.

Delectable. Users simply take a picture of their bottle and the app recognizes its produce, name, vintage, and variety. Once your wine has been recognized you can add a review. This review is shared to other users for viewing, commenting and sharing. You can also send your post to the big 3 above. This is where the cool kids hang out, and a lot of winemakers, wine writers and super enthusiasts are found using this app. If you’re new to the app be sure to follow the pros and engage.

Vivino. It’s similar to Delectable, but it reaches a larger, global audience. In addition to the wine reviews, you can view restaurant’s wine lists, too. It has a click to buy feature for every wine and if it isn’t available online it searches locally for pickup. Even the smallest wine brands can achieve great exposure with Vivino.

Cellar Tracker. Manage your own inventory, and see reviews by other users on the wines. You can find out producer, price, region, and even tasting notes.

Cor.kz.  Another inventory tracker that serves as an all in one. You can search via wine name or barcode and tap into reviews. Share your own with fellow users, and social media.

Drync. It was the first app to offer label recognition. Drync users are incredibly loyal, with almost 40% likely to make repeat purchases, with an average basket of over $25. It also offers the option to request wines that are not available on the app.

Next Glass. This app creates a personalized score that is based on each user’s history and their likes and dislikes. It provides recommendations based on that score, and is a more personalized experience for wine lovers.

Spirit of 21. The new kid on the block just launched and already has over 85,000 wine available for quick reference. You can record the aroma, taste and how much you enjoyed the wine and share with fellow users. You can add new wines, too, so if yours isn’t listed, create it! It was only released this month and it’s already making waves.

These websites and wine apps can help wineries promote their own brands as well as use this technology to grow their business. Also read: Tips on how wineries can use social media to grow their business.

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Australian Wine Industry 2016 Vintage Update

Australian Wine Vintage 2016 records increase in crush and average price. The Australian wine sector recorded increases in the average purchase price of winegrapes and its overall crush this year, according to the Vintage Report 2016 released today by Wine Australia, the Winemakers’ Federation of Australia and Wine Grape Growers Australia. In what many in the sector were calling a sensational vintage for Australian fine wine, this year there was an increase of 6 per cent in the national crush to an estimated 1.81 million tonnes.

The report also shows that the average price paid for wine grapes grew by 14 per cent to $526 per tonne across Australia, the highest average price since 2009. The increase in the weighted average purchase price was supported by an increase in the amount of fruit sold in the top graded categories of above $1500 per tonne. Wine Australia Chief Executive Officer Andreas Clark said it is encouraging to hear reports of outstanding quality translated into an increase in the average purchase price. ‘In the last 12 months, we’ve seen Australian wine exports grow to $2.11 billion and the strongest growth has been in wines of $10 or more per litre FOB. This increased enthusiasm for our fine wines internationally is helping to support a stronger demand for premium fruit in Australia,’ Mr Clark said. ‘The positivity for Australian fine wine is resonating within our key export markets and we’ll continue working closely with our grape and wine community to increase the demand and the premium paid for Australian wine.’

The report shows that the amount of premium fruit sold for more than $1500 per tonne increased to account for 7 per cent of the total crush this year. Premium Shiraz in the top graded categories of more than $1500 per tonne rose to 13 per cent of the variety’s total crush and the national average price per tonne for Shiraz increased by 14 per cent. Similarly, premium Cabernet Sauvignon in the top categories grew to 9 per cent of the variety’s crush and its national average price increased by 17 per cent. Overall, the average price paid for red winegrapes increased 13 per cent to $651 per tonne and white winegrapes grew 12 per cent to $398. Winemakers’ Federation of Australia Acting CEO Tony Battaglene said that Vintage Report 2016 shows that the weighted average price has increased over the last two vintages. ‘It’s not uncommon to see peaks and troughs across vintages due to different factors such as fluctuations in demand. However, this year, there is an increase in pricing for the second consecutive year and an increase in the overall crush, which is encouraging. We need to remain pro-active as a sector to continue to grow demand, particularly in our key export markets of the United States and China,’ Mr Battaglene said.

Australian Wine Industry

Vintage Report 2016 shows that the average purchase prices for winegrapes increased across most Australian wine regions. The warm inland wine regions increased 8 per cent to $313 per tonne and cool/temperate regions grew 4 per cent to $1,196 per tonne. Wine Grape Growers Australia Executive Director Andrew Weeks said the increase in average prices is a positive development for the Australian grape and wine community. ‘There is still much work to do, but with recent improvements in key markets and firming in wine grape prices across the nation, there is reason for cautious optimism. It is vital that this positive trend continues and that all in the wine sector are focused on continuing to build demand in key markets.’ The crush decreased overall in warm inland wine regions, with a 2 per cent increase in the Riverland offset by a 2 per cent decline in Murray Darling–Swan Hill and 4 per cent decline in Riverina.

The overall national increase in the crush came from growth in many cool/temperate wine regions, including a 57 per cent increase from Langhorne Creek, 27 per cent in Tasmania, 9 per cent from Margaret River, and 2 per cent from King Valley. The data for the Vintage Report 2016 was collected by Wine Australia through the Wine Sector Survey 2016 and gathered responses covering an estimated 88 per cent of the crush. The report provides price dispersion read-outs and average purchase prices for varieties in more than 40 Australian wine regions. Vintage Report 2016 is available to download from www.wineaustralia.com/winefacts.

For further information, please contact:

Wine Australia Hannah Bentley Communications Manager Phone: 0428 930 865 Email: Hannah.bentley@wineaustralia.com Winemakers’ Federation of Australia Alison Laslett Manager, Communications & Membership Phone: 0424 135 381 Email: alison@wfa.org.au Wine Grape Growers Australia Phone: (08) 8133 4400 Email: info@wgga.com.au About Wine Australia Wine Australia supports a competitive wine sector by investing in research, development and extension (RD&E), growing domestic and international markets and protecting the reputation of Australian wine.

Wine Australia is funded by grape growers and winemakers through levies and user-pays charges and the Australian Government, which provides matching funding for RD&E investments. Wine Australia is the trading name of the Australian Grape and Wine Authority, a Commonwealth statutory authority established under the Australian Grape and Wine Authority Act 2013.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Global Bulk Wine and Private Label Industry to meet in San Francisco

San Francisco, CA. July 4th 2016. Growers, wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits; producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing; and importers, retailers and distributors looking for private label programs can become exhibitors at the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) 2017 by registering at ibwsshow.com.

“The bulk segment holds the largest market share in the wine and spirits industry,” said Sid Patel, CEO of Beverage Trade Network.  “Bulk trading is an age-old trade between producers, but we are now seeing the business take on a very impressive position across the industry. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show aims to give the bulk trade a truly dynamic trading platform where buyers can confidently conduct business with the world’s most reputable suppliers.”

Among the highlights of IBWSS 2017 is the Business Conferences. The most influential professionals in the beverage industry will present today’s leading ideas on marketing, sales and distribution. During the two days, 16 TED-Style talks will give attendants insights into what strategies and standards the industry’s top thinkers are using to shape the marketplace, aiming to grow their private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. The confirmed speakers include Tim Hanni MW, a specialist in wine analysis and tasting, Dr Damien Wilson of Sonoma State University Wine Institute Unit, Deborah Parker Wong, a Wine Industry Journalist, Educator, Judge and Consultant, Steve Fredricks, President/Partner at Turrentine Brokerage and Brandy Rand of IWSR.

Visitors will also have access to four highly personalized Masterclasses. At each workshop, a panel of experts, winemakers, sommeliers, importers, and educators will reveal the secrets of every glass, regarding grape varieties, regions and personalities of the wine.

BTN logo
Last but definitely not the least, the IBWSS Blending Laboratory will give visitors access to a modern and specialized area where buyers and sellers will taste, blend and analyze products in a professional lab atmosphere.

Get more information regarding International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show at ibwsshow.com.

About Beverage Trade Network:  Beverage Trade Network (BTN) is a leading online marketing and B2B networking platform servicing suppliers, buyers and beverage professionals in the global beverage industry.  BTN provides a selection of sourcing solutions for importers and distributors as well as an extensive range of marketing and distribution services for international suppliers.  BTN also runs a line-up of b2b trade shows around the world.  For more information about BTN, please visit www.beveragetradenetwork.com

About The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show: The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference, open to trade professionals only, which takes place in San Francisco, CA. IBWSS exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing / private label programs and wineries / distilleries / importers who have one time excess stock to clear. IBWSS buyers are other wineries and distilleries looking to meet up their demand, Importers, Retailers and Distributors looking for private label programs, negociants who are looking to meet the growers and producers.

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Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.