What are the rules for transfer of unlabelled bottled wine?

When unlabeled bottled wine is transferred among two or more bonded wine premises for aging or labeling, the bottler must provide a copy of the approved Application For And Certification/Exemption of Label/Bottle Approval (COLA) TTB Form 5100.31 under which the wine was bottled. The transfer in bond record which accompanies the wine must be accurate and specific, and the label information record for the wine must fully support any claims made on the label to be affixed to the wine.

The responsibility for transferring accurate label information is not that of the producer alone; it is the responsibility of all holders of the wine from the time it is produced until it is removed from bond for consumption or sale.

Here are guidelines for the various parties that may be involved when unlabeled bottled wine is transferred among bonded premises:

What are the responsibilities of the Producer?

The producer of the wine must ensure that the transfer in bond record required by 27 CFR 24.309 contains accurate and specific label information for all bulk wine shipped in bond (or tax paid) to another premises for bottling. This allows the bottler to apply for a COLA and ensures that the product label is correct.

What are the responsibilities of the Bottler?

The bottler obtains a COLA which can be substantiated by the transfer record which accompanied the wine from the producer. Unless the wine will be bottled at a tax paid wine bottling house, the bottler will make sure that the wine to be bottled is received and maintained on bonded (not tax paid) premises. The bottler maintains records in accordance with 27 CFR 24.308.

If the bottler transfers unlabeled bottled wine to another bonded premises for labeling, the bottler must send the wine in bond (untaxpaid) with the COLA under which the wine was bottled. If a different product label will be affixed, the bottler must obtain a correct COLA, and forward it to the premises where the label will be affixed. The transfer in bond record that accompanies the bottled wine must contain accurate and specific information which substantiates the product label, as specified by 27 CFR 24.309. However, if unlabeled bottled wine is transferred to another bonded premises for aging only, and will be subsequently returned to the bottler for the affixing of the product label, the COLA does not have to accompany the shipments.

To reiterate, an approved label which accompanies the wine must carry the minimum label requirements, but it might not be the label eventually affixed to the product. The label used to bottle the wine is sometimes referred to as the “generic” label. The bottler may apply for another COLA for a product label with specific label claims, as long as the claims are substantiated by the label information record requirements of 27 CFR 24.314.

What does the Labeller receive from the Bottler?

The person who will affix the product label receives the unlabeled, untaxpaid bottled wine, the COLA for the product label to be affixed, and the transfer in bond record (27 CFR 24.309) which contains accurate and specific information which substantiates the label claims.

Only the bottler of the wine may apply for a COLA. If the owner of unlabeled bottled wine wants to label the wine with a label other than that which accompanied the wine, the bottler must be contacted, and the bottler must work with the owner to obtain an approved product label which is fully substantiated by the label information record for that wine.

What if the bottler is unable to provide a COLA?

If the bottler of the wine is unable to obtain label approval for the wine to be labelled, the wine may only be labeled if it is dumped to bulk and re-bottled. It may be re-bottled when an appropriate COLA is obtained by the bottler. The label may not contain any information which is not fully supported by the label information record for the wine.

Red wine in glass bottling machine at winery

What is the responsibility of the person who removes the wine from bond?

If the labelled wine is transferred in bond to another bonded wine premises for taxable removal, it must be accompanied by the transfer in bond record (27 CFR 24.309) which contains accurate and specific information which substantiates the label claims.

The person who pays the tax on the wine is the qualified proprietor of a bonded winery or bonded wine cellar, and not a wholesaler, wine broker, agent, negotiate, retailer, consumer or, necessarily, the actual owner of the wine. Bottled wine may not be removed from bond (i.e., tax paid) without a COLA and an approved product label being affixed. This requirement is given in the wine regulations at 27 CFR 24.257(a) which states in part: “The proprietor must label each bottle or other container of beverage wine prior to removal for consumption or sale.”

How long the records must be kept?

All records must be retained for a period of not less than three years from the record date or the date of last entry required to be made in the record, whichever is later.

However, TTB may require records to be kept for a period of not more than three additional years, if deemed necessary.

Source: https://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-faq.shtml

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Bulk Wine, Bulk Spirits and Private Label Show Comes To Europe in 2018

International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) which is an annual show in San Francisco that caters to the US bulk wine, bulk spirits and private label buyers now also comes to London. IBWSS London will be an annual event exhibiting global bulk wine, bulk spirits and private label service providers. The IBWSS London will give European supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and other buyers an opportunity to source bulk wine and spirits in one place, and meet private label suppliers.

Event Date: Jan 24-25, 2018

Location: The Royal Horticultural Halls Lindley Hall, London

Bulk Wine - IBWSShow London - 2018

“The bulk segment holds the largest market share in the wine and spirits industry,” said Sid Patel, CEO of Beverage Trade Network.  “Bulk trading is an age-old trade between producers, but we are now seeing the business take on a very impressive position across the industry. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show aims to give the bulk trade a truly dynamic trading platform where buyers can confidently conduct business with the world’s most reputable suppliers.”

As the central exchange for European trade, London is positioned perfectly for the fair. The city has long acted as the European trading post between the northern and southern hemispheres.  With the launch of IBWSS, international bulk suppliers from some of the world’s most important markets will have unprecedented access to the European market.

Registration for The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show will open to all international suppliers on March 1, 2017. IBWSS London is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network.

For more information, press releases and launch discount for exhibitors, please fill out interest form here: https://goo.gl/forms/zrHJ8461hV0ZFRi32

About Beverage Trade Network

Beverage Trade Network (BTN) is a leading online marketing and B2B networking platform servicing suppliers, buyers and beverage professionals in the global beverage industry. BTN provides a selection of sourcing solutions for importers and distributors as well as an extensive range of marketing and distribution services for international suppliers. BTN also runs a line-up of b2b trade shows around the world. For more information about BTN, please visit www.beveragetradenetwork.com

About The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference, open to trade professionals only, that takes place takes place in London, UK and San Francisco, CA. IBWSS exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing / private label programs and wineries / distilleries / importers who have one time excess stock to clear. IBWSS buyers are other wineries and distilleries looking to meet up their demand, Importers, Retailers and Distributors looking for private label programs, negociants who are looking to meet the growers and producers.

2018 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show – Exhibitor Registration (London) Now Open Register Today!

Meet MGP : A leading Supplier of Premium Distilled Spirits at IBWSS

MGP

MGP is recognized across the country and abroad as a leading supplier of premium distilled spirits, as well as one of America’s top multi-line producers in the spirits industry. The company is also the largest U.S. supplier of rye whiskey, as well as distilled gin.

A core competency of MGP is the company’s expertise in helping customers create custom formulations. The company offers new distillate and aged spirits in railcar, tanker truck and tote quantities. Their extensive portfolio has continued to expand for today’s discerning tastes and currently includes:

  • Bourbons
  • Whiskeys
  • Gins
  • Grain Neutral Spirits
  • Non-GMO Grain Neutral Spirits

Based in Atchison, Kansas, where the company was founded in 1941, MGP also owns distillery operations in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. The company continues to consistently provide customers with premium products while maintaining state-of-the-art facilities and capabilities. Adding to this is MGP’s finely balanced mix of art and science, which is the cornerstone of their long history of success in helping customers meet evolving consumer tastes.

Among some of the more recent developments at MGP was the creation of four new distilled gins, each featuring a distinctive flavor profile. These include distilled orange, lemon-lime, citrus berry and cucumber gins.

MGP

MGP also embarked on a major warehouse expansion at their Lawrenceburg distillery, essentially doubling the facility’s whiskey maturation capacity.

MGP offers customers the ability to work onsite in a newly constructed distilled spirits innovation center. Located at the Lawrenceburg site, the center enables greater opportunities for customers to work closely with MGP in developing custom formulations unique to their individual brands. It also includes enhanced quality assurance and sensory labs, along with new conference and meeting space.

MGP

In recognition of the company’s growing prominence in the spirits industry, MGP was honored as 2015 Distiller of the Year by the prestigious trade publication, Whisky Advocate.

MGP

Meet and Explore MGP’s services at IBWS Show. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Why bulk wine is now so important to the US and global wine market?

Sid Patel, chief executive and founder of Beverage Trade Network and the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show, gives his take on the US bulk wine market in an article that first appeared in Meininger Wine Business International.

Tim Hanni MW, a wine educator and consultant, says the challenge for international producers who want to enter the US market is “learning the intricacies of how bulk wine business is transacted”. Hanni MW, who has helped to  establish the USA’s first bulk wine trade fair, adds that it’s critical to establish “a network of connections to the brokers, buyers and sellers.”

The process starts with understanding how the US bulk wine market operates.

What is bulk wine?

Bulk wine is defined as wine that is shipped in containers (ISO tanks, Flexitanks etc), rather than in bottles or smaller packaging. Some organizations describe any wine that’s shipped in containers larger than two litres as bulk wine but, strictly speaking, bulk wine is wine that’s shipped in large containers and then repackaged at its destination.

Buyers can include wineries, importers, exporters or bottling facilities. Retail stores can also be significant bulk buyers, particularly if they’re selling ‘private label’ wines – the home brand wines created and sold by many liquor retail chains, supermarkets and grocery chain stores. The main advantage that private label wine offers retail chains is that it gives them control over the product, and eliminates the price competition from other retailers.

After all, if they’re the only ones selling that brand of wine, then they don’t face pressure to discount it. Bulk wine is typically traded in the US in one of three ways.

Tier One

The first and most important tier of the US bulk wine trade belongs to wine negociants or brokers. Turrentine Brokerage, Mancuso Wine Brokerage and The Ciatti Company, all based in California, are leading names in this space.

Such brokers offer services ranging from grape and bulk wine brokerage to global bulk wine trading, evaluations and strategic branding. It’s not surprising that San Francisco is the hub of the bulk wine business, both domestically and internationally, given that it’s both within reach of more than 4,000 Californian wineries, as well as being a significant entry point to the US.

Brokerage firms may also offer ‘services as contract manufacturers or private label makers, a part of the business known as ‘custom crush’. This involves a buyer stating the profile of the wine required, which is then made to order by a winery. The buyer usually provides cartons and labels and the winery produces the finished goods.

The brokerage firms offer a great starting point for international bulk producers seeking to enter the US market, given their experience, knowledge and connections.

Tier Two

Wine industry classifieds make up the second strata of the bulk wine business. These classifieds may appear in newspapers, industry publications or online, through websites like winebusiness.com and Wine Country Classifieds (also distributed in print).

The classifieds will list available bulk grapes, or the specifications of ready-made wines, and potential buyers then contact the supplier directly. Many wineries list bulk grapes and wines for sales on their regional association’s website. There are also web portals like VINEX and VinsenVRAC where buyers can negotiate on grape and bulk wine listings.

International producers may certainly list their products through these avenues, as long as they are able to take care of the legalities, logistics and price negotiations themselves.

Tier Three

The third section of the bulk wine trade market is known as the ‘whisper market’, where trade is conducted via personal relationships only. Products are not listed anywhere and nor is transactional data publicly available; nevertheless, this market accounts for a sizeable share of the bulk wine trade.

Insider information is circulated about how many gallons of wine are available for sale at which price, and buyers privy to this knowledge can arrange to taste the product and proceed with the purchase. Wineries can also let brokers know what wines they have for sale, and trust that the brokers will sell the product discreetly, without revealing where it came from.

Similarly, wineries or buyers looking to buy bulk wine can make their exact requirements known to a brokerage firm or negociant, who will then put the buyer in touch with a relevant winery.

This would be a trickier channel to explore for international bulk wine producers, at least until they have spent more time in the market and made deep connections within the network of bulk grape and wine buyers and sellers.

Why bulk wine?

Bulk wine is traded for many reasons, from the need to create a blend using a varietal that’s not available locally, to a need for more wine because of a poor vintage, all the way to private label. On the other side, producers sometimes have excess grapes or wine that they can’t use themselves, and the bulk wine market offers them a way to sell that excess. Wineries – unfortunately – also occasionally find themselves stuck with excess wine because a buyer has failed to make a payment or pick up the stock.

But although there are good reasons why the bulk market exists, there’s also a good reason why the whisper market exists. It’s commonly believed –wrongly – that excess wine is always poor quality. As a result, engaging openly in the bulk wine market has the potential to tarnish the reputation of a winery otherwise known for its award-winning wines.

This scenario presents an opportunity for buyers to procure bulk wines of excellent quality and use them judiciously to build new brands, or flesh out an existing wine portfolio – provided all players can navigate this complex market.

Bulk wine show

That’s why the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show was created in the US – to put buyers and sellers together.

“The IBWSS gives an advantage to international bulk wine buyers and sellers: access to the key players in the bulk wine business for both long- and short-term opportunities with the bonus of educational and informational seminars on important issues and how to expand their business in the US in a single location,” says Tim Hanni MW.

“Attendees and exhibitors can save hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars by having everything, and everyone, in one convenient place.”

The US, whose consumption is estimated at 31m hL, has now broadly established itself as the largest domestic market in the world.

At present, it buys international bulk wines mainly from Argentina, Chile and Canada. But given the growing strength of the US dollar and the emergence of powerful US retailers looking to build private label brands, there is a great opportunity for other countries to make a splash in the market.

France, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of value (29% of the world’s value) and Spain, the largest bulk wine exporter in terms of volume (23% of the world’s volume), are wine producing countries with a lot to offer this market, for example.

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Meet Ancient Lake Wine Company at IBWSS

Ancient Lake Wine CompanyAncient Lake Wine Company is a custom-designed facility built to preserve the quality of the grapes. The processing starts with a gentle belt driven receiving system feeding state of the art Bucher presses.

These presses, utilizing the “Organ” system, use fewer pressing cycles to extract optimum juice yields without excessive pressures that will release unwanted phenolic characteristics. From there, juice is sent to their stainless steel tanks, which are all individually insulated creating a micro-climate for each lot of wine produced, allowing them to apply specific techniques (native or non-native fermentations, variable fermentation temperature control, etc.) to each tank.

Additionally, optimum yields are desirable for most of their customers, so they installed a ceramic plated high solids cross-flow filter to capture close to 95% of the product, which protects any non-desirable characteristics that all Diatomaceous Earth filters introduce to the wine. Because of these systems, they are able to provide all customers uniquely sophisticated, vineyard specific, high quality, high yield wines that will be sure to meet and exceed all expectations.

List of services offered by Ancient Lake Wine company –

  • Bulk Wine
  • Custom Crushing
  • Press & Go/Pressing
  • Custom Winemaking
  • Wine Storage
  • Bottling

Ancient Lake Wine CompanyThey are taking  natural products in its prime, and helping it show its maximum potential through the art of winemaking to reach their clients’ goals.  They have a strong passion in allowing the grapes to speak for themselves through the wine, helping consumers identify the region they were grown and the different characteristics each site’s terroir promotes.

In their pursuit for excellence and their client’s success, they take many educated risks to help reach an optimum flavor profile for each block of grapes they process, narrowing down winemaking techniques that are uniquely desirable.  Hence, culminating a structurally balanced, terroir expressive wine which all wine enthusiasts are sure to never forget.

Meet and Explore Ancient Lake Wine Company’s services at IBWS Show. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference which will give wineries, importers, supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers. Book now and save on exhibitor rates 

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

US Australian Wine Export Report

Wine Australia’s Head of Market for the Americas, Aaron Ridgway, takes a look at the latest US Australian wine Export Report and the current market for Australian wine in the U.S.  While it’s been a tough ride for many in recent years, there are now clear signs of recovery

AUSTRALIAN WINE – STILL AN EMERGING CATEGORY IN THE WORLD’S BIGGEST WINE MARKET?
While the challenges of selling Australian wine in the U.S. remain significant, the release of their latest export figures in October 2016 certainly indicate that a broader recovery may be under way.  A decline in volume is offset by an increase in value – just the type of pendulum swing that many say the category has needed for some time.

Australia is the second-largest exporter of wine to the U.S., but less than 10% of that volume sells for above $10 AUD per litre. This, coupled with a relatively small brand set (roughly 500 brands: just ahead of Chile but well behind Argentina and only 1/3 as many as Spain), means it is not inaccurate to say that Australia is still an emerging category in the U.S.

US EXPORT REPORT – ICONIC AUSTRALIAN’ BRANDS LEAD THE CHARGE
A big winner in its quest to grow a premium Australian offering is Treasury Wine Estates, led by its iconic Penfolds and emerging sub-$15 19 Crimes brands.  ‘Our focus has been on growing in the premium segments of the US market, and we are really starting to see our investments in our brands pay off,’ says TWE’s Chief Marketing Officer, Simon Marton.  ‘Innovation within our brands to drive growth is fundamental and we will continue to bring creative distinctive new wines to the US market to drive interest and excitement with wine consumers.’

THE ON TRADE: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR FINE AUSTRALIAN WINE?
In higher end restaurants, a tough channel for Australian wines in recent times, there are signs that a door may be starting to open. Importers like Negociants USALittle PeacockVine Street Imports and Hudson Wine Brokers continue to promote restaurant-focused wines, particularly in the key New York market.  Michael Engelmann MS, Wine Director at the Modern in Manhattan, has evolved the restaurant’s 3,000-bottle list to include 100 wines from Australia – up from just a dozen or so when he started.  He often pours Australian wines by the glass, something that is still, sadly, a rarity in starred big city restaurants.  But according to Engelmann, there is interest beyond what’s currently imported – surely another sign that Australia is still emerging.  ‘Do I see room for a few more Aussie producers?  Yes.  It’s just a question of whether I can get them or not.’

US EXPORT REPORT – IS PREMIUM AUSTRALIAN WINE THE WAY FORWARD IN THE U.S.?
For Australian wineries of any size, a key puzzle remains extracting results from traditional distributor partnerships.  Three-quarters of all wine sold in the United States is domestic, and large wine companies tend to occupy much of the mind share (not to mention monthly and annual sales targets) in the top distribution tier.  With two-thirds of the wholesale wine market belonging to the top 10 distributors, it remains challenging for large Australian portfolios to compete with Californian wine, and equally tricky for smaller houses looking to take a position on Australia to achieve traction alongside the majors.

Gary Gaines, Senior Vice President of Chains at the Winebow Group, which operates in 20 states and sells a mix of importer-sourced and direct-import Australian brands, cites premium price points combined with greater varietal diversity as key for the category’s future.  ‘If you look at where Australia is really performing today, it’s in the $14.99-19.99 retail segment,’ he said, adding that much of his portfolio’s growth is coming from family-owned wineries.

THE AUSTRALIAN WINE REVIVAL IN THE U.S. GAINS MOMENTUM
While California, the U.S.’s largest market for Australian wine, was marginally off in the 12 months to September, there are signs that independent volume retail is on the up.  Ryan Woodhouse, who buys the Australian wines at K&L Wine Merchants in California, is very upbeat about interest and sales in his stores.  ‘I think (Australian wine) has definitely turned a corner in perception. For years’ people have been saying that Aussie wines are bouncing back, but as of the last 12 months that’s finally ringing true.’

Continue reading here

Source: Wine Australia Blog, Report review by Aaron Ridgway, Head of Market for America

Learn from some of the most influential professional in the beverage industry at the IBWSS conference. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s principal ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. Register now to get lowest pricing.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Inception of the American Viticulture and the French Winemakers

While one cannot speak of sustained French immigration to the American colonies, some notable examples can be cited. The Labadists were mystics who lived communally on their 4,000 acre Maryland farm. There were the French settlers of Gallipolis in Ohio who, it appears, produced a wine so poor in quality it was named méchant Suresne after a wine known for its sourness produced near Paris.

The arrival of French Huguenots in South Carolina is of particular interest because, for the first time, a large group of settlers reached the New World with the primary aim of growing grapes. They had left France for England to escape religious persecution and in 1763 petitioned the British Government to provide them with land in South Carolina so that they could “apply themselves to the cultivation of vines and of silk.”

The request was approved. Setting sail a year latter, the Huguenots reached South Carolina founding the township of New Bordeaux in the southern part of the colony. They were joined four years later by another group of co-religionists lead by the forceful Louis de Mesville de Saint Pierre. But now came a setback. The colony’s governing body refused to provide the settlers with the funds needed to purchase vine cuttings. Saint Pierre thereupon decided to return to England and appeal for financial aide to Lord Hillsborough secretary for the American Colonies, but to no avail.

Rumors had it that Hillsborough had received a 250,000 British pounds bribe from French wine 2 merchants dismayed at the prospect of losing the lucrative American and British markets. Budgetary constraints are a more likely explanation. A costly war with France had just ended forcing the British Government to reduce expenditures. It was about that time that Parliament, seeking new sources of revenue, passed the Stamp Tax and Revenue Act which set the stage for the American Revolution. Samples of New Bordeaux wine were submitted to the Royal Society earning for Saint Pierre a gold metal but nothing more.

Other personal appeals proving to be equally fruitless–one was even addressed to King George III– Saint Pierre decided to take his message to the public publishing a tract bearing the lengthy title, The Great Utility in Establishing the Culture of Vines and the Absolute necessity of Supporting the Infant Colony of French Protestants Settled in New Bordeaux South Carolina, who have brought the Culture of Vine and the Art of Raising Silk to Perfection.

When nothing came of this, Saint Pierre had no recourse but to sail back to South Carolina stopping off in Madeira, however, to purchase vine cuttings. (Had financial support been provided by wealthy Huguenots?) A final setback awaited his return for the cuttings died soon after being planted, victims of the root-boring lice, phylloxera. The New Bordeaux community eventually scattered, Saint Pierre being its last resident.

He would die in the first year of the American Revolution, the victim of an Indian attack. Although Saint Pierre was unable to create a productive vineyard, his efforts were not lost on future winemakers, especially those from Bordeaux who knew of the fledgling community across the ocean that bore the crescent city’s name, and of the valiant grape grower who had ventured there.

Some followed his example and many more seriously 3 considered doing so, for after Saint Pierre, sailing to the New World to grow grapes had become a realistic prospect appealing to adventurous souls willing to brave the unknown.

Continue Reading here

Article Source –
French winemakers

American Association of Wine Economists, AAWE Working Paper, No. 207, History & Politics 

Author – Sal Westrich, Pratt Institute, New York

 

Learn from some of the most influential professional in the beverage industry at the IBWSS conference. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s principal ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. Register now to get lowest pricing.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

10 Factors to Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner

BTN talks to Steve Dorfman, partner at the Ciatti Company about the 10 Factors That One Should Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner.

Steve joined the Ciatti Company in 2007 after working with the Brown-Forman Corporation, Fetzer Vineyards, Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards and Bolla Wine brands for 24 years. His primary responsibilities are wine and grape sales within California, and the supply demands of markets throughout Europe, Scandinavia and Australia.

Ciatti Company is one of the world’s largest broker of bulk wine, and their services include brokering grapes, evaluating prices from a lot of wine to entire wineries and sourcing both domestic and international concentrate, as well as alcoholic spirits.

With such extensive experience in this industry, we asked him for his insights for buyers looking to get into this business. He mentioned that the buyer should do extensive groundwork to figure out the type of wine they would like to create. With a clear requirement in mind, they will be able to approach bulk suppliers with greater ease.

BTN talks to Steve Dorfman, partner at the Ciatti Company about the 10 Factors That One Should Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner.

1. Know your market: On-Premise or Off-Premise, branded, private label etc.
What is your customer profile? The wine you create will be based on this. Are you looking to create a premium pour? Or a value driver with low profit margins to supply in a national retail chain. An answer to this question will lead you to seek an appropriate supply partner.

2. Know your target customer: Wholesaler, retailer, consumer
These three tiers are all your customers ultimately. Therefore, you must understand the profile of the customer at each tier that you are trying to reach. Will you be placing your brand with a small to medium wholesaler or a large one? Will it be retail chain or a mom-and-pop shop or a supermarket that will house your brands? What is the profile of the end consumer that will be buying your wine? These factors will help you determine the type of wine you require, the margins you will need to keep and lead up to the supplier who can make it for you.

3. Know your plan to go to market: Do you have a brand? Do you have all of your appropriate licenses?
Often, these steps are overlooked and the time and effort underestimated when one sets out to create a brand. Ordering wine from a bulk supplier is only one step in the chain. You need to finalize your brand’s name, SKUs, label designs, carton design, decide whether you will use a cork or bottle cap, file for required licenses. Without these, you will not be ready to go to market.

Continue Reading : 10 Factors to Consider when Selecting a Bulk Wine Supply Partner

Bulk wine supply partner

Steve Dorfman, Partner and Broker, The Ciatti Company.
Steve joined the Ciatti Company in 2007 after working with the Brown-Forman Corporation, Fetzer Vineyards, Sonoma-Cutrer Vineyards and Bolla Wine brands for 24 years. His primary responsibilities are wine and grape sales within California, and the supply demands of markets throughout Europe, Scandinavia and Australia.

Learn from some of the most influential professional in the beverage industry at the IBWSS conference. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s principal ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. Register now to get lowest pricing.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

A Modern Classic or the Kitchen Sink: References for Inspired Blends

This is the first webinar in a series titled Inspired Blends about which Deborah Parker Wong will speak at the IBWSS Conference on July 26 & 27, 2017.

The webinar titled A Modern Classic or the Kitchen Sink delves into the world of blends and how this translates into consumer behavior, trends and finally sales in the USA. She examines the rules some successful brands use to create blends and yet how others are also successful even in not adhering to these same rules. Ultimately, what a kitchen sink denotes is not always what it is!

You will learn about the blends that people are drinking most and the shifts happening in the market. This will help you understand the blends you should most likely have in your portfolio as an importer, distributor or retailer in the US market.

Meet Deborah Parker Wong, an opinion-leading communicator, journalist and author who specializes in the wine and spirits industries. As Northern California editor for m-dash Publishing and The Tasting Panel, SOMM Journal and Clever Root magazines, she writes monthly industry columns and reports on the global wine and spirits industries with an emphasis on technology and trends. Join her at IBWS Show Conference and learn more on wine blending.

Learn from some of the most influential professional in the beverage industry at the IBWSS conference. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s principal ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your private label, bulk wine and bulk spirits business. Register now to get lowest pricing.

Only 10 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowRegister Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Meet JF Hillebrand: Global Beverage Logistics at IBWS Show

JF HillebrandWhen transporting beverages, companies around the world have come to rely on the logistics services of JF Hillebrand. Combining expert staff, specialist knowledge and market-leading technologies, we offer a complete logistics management solution to a range of customers across the globe.

100% Beverage, 100% JF Hillebrand
Since inception, JF Hillebrand has been solely dedicated to the business of beverage logistics. Over 170 years of experience has equipped them with specialist skills and dependable processes – shaped around the unique demands of the products we handle.

100% Global, 100% Local
You’ll find a JF Hillebrand office or representative in every major beverage market in the world. Their global network assures customers of a single set of world-class service standards, but also means they can act more efficiently at a local level, with expert local staff who understand the challenges faced by local customers.

100% Innovative, 100% In touch
They strive to be at the forefront of logistics and IT developments, developing innovative systems and solutions which add tangible value to the customers. Through investment in innovation, we create solutions that set the standard – from online management tools, to the very latest developments in transportation.

JF Hillebrand is the world’s leading specialist logistics provider to the wine and spirit trade, with a global network of offices in every major wine and spirit market.

Learn more: Global Beverage logistics 

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