What Drives Imports and Exports of Bulk Wine?

Georgi’s Conclusion

Exchange rates are part of the explanation. There are other things that influence the wine trade: yields, demand changes, policy (duty drawbacks)

Theory and Reality: Bulk wine 2011-2014

A strong dollar

  •  Increases volume of imports and
  •  Lowers the U.S. dollar price of imports
  •  Reduces volume of U.S. Exports and
  •  Raises prices of U.S Exports for foreign buyers in their currencies

Between 2011 and 2014 the dollar gained about 15.5% against currencies of most wine producing countries (weighted by value of imports).

The dollar gained about 7.5% against the currencies of major wine importing countries (Euro, Pound, Yen, Yuan, HK Dollar) • What happened to U.S. Imports and Exports of bulk wine?

U.S. Total Bulk Imports by Month

Chile, Argentina, and Australia are the major bulk suppliers to the U.S. (87%)

Chile, Argentina, and Australia Bulk Imports as Trendlines

Changes in Bulk Wine Quantities and Price (dollars/liter) from 2011-2014

Thoughts on Bulk Imports and Theory?

  • Bulk imports did increase in 2012 for all countries but then declined in volume the following two years
  • However Chilean and Australian prices fell in U.S. dollars by 18% and 19% and these two countries accounted for more than 50% of bulk shipments.
  • Argentine bulk prices in U.S. dollars per liter remained roughly constant, but volumes declined by 60% from the 2012 high. Not competitive with Chile and Australia?

Despite a strong dollar, volumes of U.S. bulk shipments have remained fairly constant

What Was Happening in the U.S.?

  • Domestic quantity demanded has been increasing (2-4% per year) • Quantity demanded for wine under $7 a bottle has decreased by 7% from 2011 to 2014
  • Short vintages in 2010 and 2011. CA supply did not keep up with U.S. demand.
  • This led to increased bulk imports in 2012, accounting for the spike • 2012 and 2013 were two record harvests in California
  • Southern S.J Valley harvest produced a record 2.48 million tons in 2013, filling tanks and reducing the need for bulk wine imports
  • All this effected California prices and import volumes

Quantity Demanded and California Shipments

Recent California Grape Crush

Drawback, if a factor, encouraged exports (and would tend to raise grape prices)

Conclusion?

  • Exchange rates are one of several factors that effect grape prices.
  • A strong dollar makes imports more competitive with domestic wine, thus lowering grape prices in California (at least for those segments where imports are a substitute)
  • But decreasing U. S. demand for inexpensive wine coupled with large CA harvests also reduces CA prices (supply/demand)
  • We live in a global marketplace. The two strategies for success are: (1) Differentiation (i.e. reduce the potential for substitution)(2) Increased efficiency (out compete foreign producers)

Source : http://aic.ucdavis.edu/publications/CAWGLapsley2015.pdf

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

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Beverage Trade Network Announces the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show, London in 2018

Beverage Trade Network is pleased to announce the launch of the International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show in London on 24 & 25 January, 2018.

IBWSS London will give supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers.
In addition to a wide range of programs running throughout the fair, the trade show will also feature a business conference dedicated to the private label and bulk wine and spirit business. With in-depth market studies and instructional seminars from some of the industry`s biggest names, the central part of the conference`s remit is to encourage sustainable growth and profitability in the bulk wine and spirit sector.

IBWSS London exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers, brokers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing or private label programs, and wineries, distilleries and importers who have one-time excess stock to clear.

IBWSS buyers are wineries and distilleries looking to meet their demand, importers, retailers and distributors looking for private label programs, and brokers and negociants who are looking to meet new growers and producers.

`The bulk segment holds the largest market share in the wine and spirits industry,’ said Sid Patel, CEO of Beverage Trade Network.  `Bulk trading is an age-old trade between producers, but we are now seeing the business take on a very impressive position across the industry. The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show in London aims to give the bulk trade a truly dynamic trading platform where buyers can confidently conduct business with the world’s most reputable suppliers.’

As one of the leading private label and bulk wine and spirits markets in the western world, London is positioned perfectly for the fair. The UK has long developed the bulk trade and is home to many bulk traders servicing the globe.  

With the launch of IBWSS London, international bulk suppliers from some of the world`s most important markets will have unprecedented access to the European market.

Registrations for The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show open to all international suppliers on February 8, 2017. Exhibitors can reserve their tables here: http://bit.ly/2kqzcdR. For more information about visiting or exhibiting at the fair, please contact info@beveragetradenetwork.com.

About Beverage Trade Network: Beverage Trade Network (BTN) is a leading online marketing and B2B networking platform servicing suppliers, buyers and beverage professionals in the global beverage industry. BTN provides a selection of sourcing solutions for importers and distributors as well as an extensive range of marketing and distribution services for international suppliers. BTN also runs a line-up of B2B trade shows around the world. For more information about BTN, please visit www.beveragetradenetwork.com

2018 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show – Exhibitor Registration (London) Now Open Register Today!

International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show in London

Special Exhibitor Pricing Ends March 31, 2017.

Get 2 Day IBWSS Conference Sessions Pass Included With Your Exhibitor Registration. (Must Book by March 31, 2017).

IBWSS exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing or private label programs, and wineries, distilleries and importers who have one-time excess stock to clear.

WHO ARE THE VISITORS / BUYERS?

Wineries, distilleries, importers, distributors, retailers, national and regional chains, negociants, brokerage firms who are looking for bulk wine, bulk spirits, private label manufacturing and grapes.

WHERE AND WHEN

July 26-27, 2017 – South San Francisco Conference Center

TTB and Sample assistant will be provided to overseas exhibitors. Please email us for more information / questions about sending samples.

LIMITED EXHIBITOR SPOTS AVAILABILITY

The event will offer 80 spots, so space is limited. Exhibitors are encouraged to reserve space early as booths are expected to sell out quickly.

SET UP INCLUDES

The show is a trestle table set up, you will not pay anything extra for chairs and tables and wifi. Your pricing overs ALL costs associated with the show. You are required to bring in one roll-up banner only and can put marketing material on your table.

IBWSS will provide you with the below.
– Tasting Table
– White Tablecloth & Skirting
– 2 Chairs + Ice Bucket + Spittoon
– Glasses will be provided to buyers at the show

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Exhibitor

Questions Asked by US Bulk Wine Producers

Q1 – Another winery is doing a custom crush for me, and will be producing and bottling my wine.  How do I get a label approval?

Federal regulations require that the bottling winery must submit the label for approval.  Even though the wine is produced and bottled for you and/or will be distributed exclusively (or not) by you, the bottler/importer is responsible for getting the label approval.

Q2- I operate a domestic winery and I am making wine from grapes or juice that I have purchased from another state or country.  What appellation of origin may I use?

This is a complicated question, and the answer (see 27 CFR §4.25(b)) depends on the particular circumstances. State or local laws and regulations may be more restrictive than Federal laws and regulations in some instances, and, to use an appellation, the wine must conform to the laws and regulations of the named appellation area.  (Please note that we use here certain states or regions only as examples to illustrate certain different circumstances.)  We advise that you confer with state and local authorities regarding their requirements before finalizing your COLA submission.  Remember that your wine, and the records that you keep, must adequately support any claims which are made on your label. The following situations serve as examples.  There are certainly more factual circumstances that might have a different outcome.

Situation 1:   I am making a wine with grapes or juice originating from a state that is contiguous to (that is,  touching)  my own state (e.g. when California grapes are used to produce  wine in Oregon).Suppose that I have purchased Napa Valley, California, grapes that I will produce into wine in Oregon.

The most specific appellation of origin eligible for use is the name of the contiguous state (California).  A viticultural area appellation of origin (e.g. Napa Valley) may NOT  be used because the wine was not fully finished within that state.

Situation 2:  The state from which the winemaking material originates is not contiguous to the state in which the wine is produced. For example, California grapes have been purchased to produce wine in New York.

The most specific appellation of origin eligible – for use is a country appellation, such as “American.”  Note that when a country is used as an appellation of origin a vintage date is NOT permissible for the wine.

Situation 3:   I am purchasing grapes or juice from another country.  An appellation of origin may NOT be used, as this wine is not eligible for such claims (see 27 CFR §4.25(b)(2)(ii)).  A vintage date or a varietal designation (e.g. Merlot) may not appear  on the wine,  as both items require an appellation of origin present on the label.  The wine may be labeled only with  a more general class or type statement, such as “Red Wine” or “White Wine.”

Q3 – May a proprietor of a bonded wine premises transfer bulk wine to a bonded wine premises, brewery, or distilled spirits plant?

Source: https://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-faq.shtml

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

bulk wine producers

 

How to Have Your Own Wine Label Without Having a Winery

On the surface, it almost sounds like an oxymoron – having your own wine label without having a winery. But private label wines are becoming an increasingly popular segment of the U.S. wine market, and for good reason: launching your own private label wine can boost revenue, increase profit margins, and help you create a unique brand identity that sets you apart from the competition.

Perhaps the best example of a private label wine business taking off is the Kirkland Signature line of wines at Costco, which is already the #1 wine retailer in the U.S. Through its exclusive partnerships with wineries in the United States, Costco is able to offer unique, premium wines at half the cost anywhere else. Similarly, Trader Joe’s has sold over 50 million cases of its private label wine since 2002.

And a growing number of retailers – including some national wine and liquor chains and supermarkets – are following suit, viewing the private label wine business as a way to boost revenue and grow margins. According to some estimates, the margins on private label wine bottles are 10-15 percent higher than on bottles from national brands like Kendall Jackson and Barefoot.

Plus, as wine experts point out, retailers are essentially shortening their supply chain by squeezing out some of the middleman who are making their mark-ups every time they sell a case of wine. You are getting your wine direct from the winery, after all.

As a result, it’s no longer out of the ordinary to see private label wines show up on the shelves of supermarkets. Even a few national wine and spirits stores, such as Total Wine, now offer private label wines. According to the current estimates, private label wines now account for approximately 5 percent of all wines sold in the United States, and that figure could be headed higher. Some projections call for private label wines to eventually account for 20 percent of the entire market.

That would make private label wines roughly the equivalent of other private label goods (i.e. private label pasta, private label canned goods) that supermarkets now sell. And in France and Italy, the private label wine market is even more popular, accounting for nearly one-third of all wines sold.

In addition to the economic appeal of these private label wines, there’s also the branding aspect that can help to differentiate companies from other restaurants or retailers. For example, the legendary Italian restaurant Carmine’s in New York City has used private label wines as part of its overall branding strategy. It has worked with wineries to create a range of different wines – Pinot Grigio, Chianti, Prosecco, Montepulciano and Trebbiano – that it can offer to customers as examples of small, family-made wines, which can be enjoyed as part of a family-style feast. For families and tourists on a budget, it’s a way to create a welcoming wine menu that is also true to the restaurant’s overall brand.

The important point to keep in mind is that a private label wine doesn’t say “private label” on the bottle. To the casual wine drinker, it looks just like any other wine they might drink. While Costco and Trader Joe’s customers may realize they are drinking private label wines, that’s not necessarily true in the restaurant and hospitality business.

In general, private label wines are starting to catch on as customers become more adventurous and daring in their choices. They may not recognize the wine or the label, but are tempted to try it and experiment. And, as we’ve seen already, having an eye-catching label is often just as effective as having a first-class wine in terms of attracting attention. The “snob appeal” of avoiding private label wines, if there ever was any, appears to be fading. After all, the bottle, the cork, and the label are no different. It’s just a matter of convincing a customer to try a $10-15 bottle of wine they may not recognize instead of a bottle of wine that’s 2-3 times more expensive.

If anything, the major trend is towards private, exclusive wines that are grown in limited quantities. So that’s how businesses can choose to position their private label wines. Instead of being used to attract cost-conscious customers, it’s a way to attract affluent, sophisticated customers. That may not be true for Costco, which is focused on selling huge quantities at low prices, but it certain works for the hospitality business, where there is a constant search to differentiate oneself from the competition. As a result, everyone from a national chain of steakhouses to a small boutique hotel chain might be interested in creating a private label wine.

Bottles of white wine in a bottling plant

Which leads to the obvious question: How do you get started if you want to own your own private label?

The first step, say industry insiders, is to figure out the types of wines that your customers enjoy drinking and what the average price of the bottles they are ordering is. From there, you need to make a few projections about the growth projections of your business. You don’t want to be ordering thousands of cases of wine, and then be stuck with dead inventory. Also, since every label must denote the place of origin of the wine, the wines you select should be a natural fit for the restaurant in terms of region and style of wine.

From there, it’s time to reach out to wineries that might potentially be interested in a deal. Some wineries are able to accommodate a wide range of order sizes – everything from 5 cases to 1000 cases – while other wineries prefer only to work on smaller or larger order sizes. Once you’ve narrowed down your choices, the vintner will work with you on every aspect of creating your own wine – down to the creation of the label and even the type of cork. There are also independent design companies specializing in designing wine labels, cases and other promotional material. They will design a label that meets the specifications of the country you want to sell in and the tier you want to sell the wine in.

From there, all you have to do is place the order and you’ll soon have your private wine label, all without the time and expense of actually operating your own winery.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

Winery

10 Tips for Building Better Wine Businesses

1.Start by understanding your customer value proposition. Only part of this stems from your company’s unique heritage and / or personality. To be successful, this needs to be strongly linked to what your customers ultimately want from the experience of your brands. There is some excellent research on this that is publicly available. Getting it right is therefore not out of the reach of small companies.

2.Once you understand what customers value most, you can then remove what they don’t want (thereby reducing costs and freeing up cash), focus your communication on what they do want (often at no additional cost), differentiate your company on the basis of fulfilling customer needs more accurately than any competitor (again often at no extra cost) and raise prices (because your offering is more highly valued).

3.Always be asking the question–“If I could start with a blank canvas today what would our wine business look like?” It’s all too easy to let existing assets, existing product lines and existing ways of doing things blind us to what it is that our consumers value most. Often it’s simplicity. Complexity usually adds to costs and often only serves to confuse customers. Retaining unnecessary or irrelevant product lines, assets or business processes is the worst contributor.

4.Make everyone in the company accountable for securing customer preference. This is not just the job of marketing but of everyone in the company, the owner most particularly. Make this the focus of the way every employee innovates their job processes on a daily basis.

5.Invest in relationships. This is particularly so with major distribution partners. Make sure sufficient time and money is invested before demanding results. Be prepared to invest up front in bringing them to your home base and entertaining them in order to build enduring friendships.

6.Make all employees champions for profit. Develop a culture of honesty around net revenue. Make sure everyone knows the actual price achieved net of all discounts, rebates, bonus stock and anything else that might otherwise cloud the true profit picture. Keep them focused on reducing costs but let them know that a percentage increase in wine company revenue is, on average, twice as effective as the same percentage decrease in the cost of goods sold and 3-4 times as effective as the same percentage saving in operating expenses.

7.Optimise your pricing mix. Focus first on selling more, higher margin product in high value markets to high value customers. Beware of people in love with “big volume”. Big numbers make for big stories but often mean a lot of running around for no additional profit.

8.Build better business intelligence gathering systems–most companies are good at monitoring their own press. Very few have effective systems in place to monitor competitors, track changes in consumer preferences and turn customer feedback into customer value added.

9.Build 5-10 year Strategic Plans, forecast rolling 12 month budgets, link them to the most relevant KPIs and tie remuneration to these wherever possible. Everybody knows they should do this. Few do. The difference in the performance of companies that do is enormous.

10.Watch your cashflow – building a cashflow forecast is a relatively easy exercise with the right software and some quality assistance. Some people survive years of losses but you can only run out of cash once. In a cash hungry business like wine–Cashflow is not just King but Oxygen

This article is contributed by Peter McCartney, Wine Business Solutions

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January