IBWSS Super Early Bird Visitor Registration Now Open

The International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show (IBWSS) is an annual trade show and conference, open to trade professionals only, which takes place in San Francisco, CA. The event is dedicated to the business of bulk wine, bulk spirits, private label and contract bottling business. Join the biggest gathering of bulk wine, bulk spirits, contract bottling and private label business professionals.

WHO ARE THE VISITORS / BUYERS?
IBWSS visitors are buyers looking to meet up their demand of bulk wines, bulk spirits, private label programs, grape buying or contract manufacturing.Wineries, distilleries, importers, distributors, retailers, national and regional chains, negociants, brokerage firms and press members.

WHERE AND WHEN
July 26-27, 2017 – South San Francisco Conference Center (11am to 6pm)

ibwss

PRICING FOR VISITOR REGISTRATION:
Super Early Bird: $25 (Ends Oct 30,2016)
Early Bird: $35 (Ends March 30, 2017)
Regular: $55 (From April 2017)

Super Early Bird Visitors will get special discount codes for IBWSS conference and workshops.

CANCELLATION  / REFUND POLICY
Full refund if you cancel before May 30, 2017. No refund from June 1, 2017

EVENT PRODUCER
International Bulk Wine and Spirits Competition is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish IBWSS as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the private label and bulk beverage industry.

Get your visitor trade pass at super early bird pricing and join the industry at International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show in San Francisco. Meet more than 80 exhibitors from all over the world offering private label, bulk wine, bulk spirits and contract winemaking services. (Register online) to save and avoid gate ticketing fee)

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Meet Rack & Riddle: custom wine services at IBWS Show

Rack & Riddle Custom Wine Services offers unparalleled services for still and sparkling wine production. Founders and wine industry veterans Rebecca Faust and Bruce Lundquist harness a combined expertise of more than 40 years to create a truly custom operation based in the heart of Sonoma County wine country.

Offering grape-to-bottle, base-to-bottle, or any service in between, Rack & Riddle unlocks the ability for wineries or retailers to create award-winning méthode champenoise sparkling wines. Shiners are also available for clients’ private labels.

Contract winemaking supplier, Rack & Riddle has grown to 75 employees, including an expert winemaking, production and cellar staff and on-site lab team.

Learn more:  Custom crush and private label wine services 

Looking to develop a private label, source bulk wine or meet contract winemaking suppliers?

Get your visitor trade pass and join the industry at International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show in San Francisco. Meet more than 80 exhibitors from all over the world offering private label, bulk wine, bulk spirits and contract winemaking services. (Register online)to save and avoid gate
ticketing fee)

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Hours Left To Become an Exhibitor at Early Bird Rates – IBWS Show 2017

International Bulk Wine and Spirits ShowIBWSS (IBWSS) is the only event dedicated to the business of bulk wine, bulk spirits, private label and contract bottling business. Join the biggest gathering of bulk wine, bulk spirits, contract bottling and private label business professionals.

50% Exhibitor spots are already sold out. Reserve your spot today with early bird pricing (ends in 48 hours) and join the biggest event for bulk wine, bulk spirits and private label business in USA. Reserve here and grow your bulk wineEarly bird pricing ends in 48 hours. Save $400 on exhibitor fee and 1 complimentary conference ticket valued at $600. Total Savings of $1000. Prices go up from October 1.

IBWSS will give supermarkets, retailers, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and other buyers a premiere international platform to source bulk wine and spirits and meet private label suppliers.

In addition to a wide range of programs running throughout the fair, the trade show will also feature a business conference dedicated to the private label and bulk wine and spirit business. With in-depth market studies and instructional seminars from some of the industry’s biggest names, the central part of the conference’s remit is to encourage sustainable growth and profitability in the bulk wine and spirit sector.

IBWSS exhibitors are wineries and distilleries looking to sell bulk wine and spirits, producers and negociants who offer contract manufacturing or private label programs, and wineries, distilleries and importers who have one-time excess stock to clear.

IBWSS buyers are wineries and distilleries looking to meet their demand, importers, retailers and distributors looking for private label programs, and negociants who are looking to meet new growers and producers.

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

ciattiHarvests in Europe are in full swing and the trend is for volumes in line with or below those seen in 2015. Drought in France and Spain has erased talk there of larger harvests than last year; France could be approximately 10% down,Spain in line. There is uncertainty about volumes in Italy,with very early signs that Pinot Grigio could be down as much as 15%. California, meanwhile, is looking at a crop in line with the five-year average and one that won’t soften prices, which are likely to remain where they have been for the past 12-18 months.

South of the equator, Chile and Argentina were visited by very cold temperatures and frosts in early September, causing some concern over damage to the vines and if it means spring, starting in the middle of this month, will see frosts. There is not a huge amount of wine there: generic reds, for example, are short and pricey in Argentina, but when buyers cross the Andes into Chile they are confronted by prices firmer than they would like. International buyers who do not enjoy pre-existing relationships in Chile are arriving to discover they have to pay perhaps as much as 50% more than they were hoping to. Chile’s 2016 harvest was down in volume and quality: grapes for the coming, 2017 harvest are already being purchased and the minimum guaranteed price will be higher than that of 2016.

Cool temperatures in South Africa mean the vines there are having a good winter rest, though much more rain is needed to fill the catchment dams. Statistics suggest a substantial wine stock in South Africa’s cellars by the end of 2016: how much of it is uncontracted? Meanwhile, New Zealand’s exports to the US are a good news story – perhaps too good, considering demand for Sauvignon Blanc is set to continue rising while production expansion in NZ is growing very difficult: supply could be trending very short over the next few years.

california

The harvest in California is in full swing and cooler temperatures at the end of August into September have allowed grapes to size-up a little, helping yield nudge up closer to the five year average, perhaps roughly in line with the 2014 harvest, which was 3.9 million tons. Whites are coming in first, with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir for white wines looking average in volume or just under. At this stage, there are no reports of confirmed smoke taint anywhere in the state; mildew has been successfully fought back. Napa Valley’s 2016 harvest update

Read More : Ciatti Global Market Update – September 2016

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

The History of Bulk Wine

Wine is probably one of the oldest alcoholic drinks in the history of human kind. Its existence is closely connected to our existence on Earth, evidence of early humans consuming wine dating back to the beginnings of time. The first palpable signs to attest that our ancestors loved wine, is the oldest winery in the world found on the territory of Armenia, dating back to 4100 BC, a site discovered by a team of researchers from UCLA, in 2007. So, wine is around almost since we are, slowly conquering every part of the world. How did wine travel from one corner of the world to another? Wine bottles were not available right away, because we had to invent glass first. Thus, wine was transported in bulk quantities, together with grape vines.

Ancient civilizations, more precisely the Greek, Romans, and Etruscans, used large barrels and amphorae to store and transport wine. This was the way to satisfy the demand for wine, whether wine was being transported by land or ship. These containers for wine were usually large enough to allow men to handle them by hand, since there were no cranes to help them out. It was not the bottle of wine that appeared first, rather the wine barrel being the first to mark wine’s history. Of course, smaller vessels, usually made out of ceramic, were used to serve wine on the table. The tradition of bulk wine continued to the Medieval Times. Even fine assortments of wine like Burgundy and Bordeaux started out in bulk quantities. Still, this practice almost came to the verge of extinction, when bottled wine appeared. It was Chateau Mouton Rothschild that started this revolution back in 1924, bringing to the market glass that was reliable and affordable. It was believed that the characteristics of the wine bottle reflected the quality and authenticity of a particular wine.

The practice of bottling fine varieties of wine continued, and it remains a practice even today, the estate bottle becoming the standard for all quality wines. But even so, bulk wine did not disappear, remaining an important mechanism in the demand and supply scheme on the market. It may be true that some people love to buy and collect fine wine editions, keeping special wine in bottles, as a sign that the particular wine is not a regular, every day wine.

A great benefit of bulk wine is the fact that it can access new markets. Let’s take the Scandinavian market, for instance, where the bag-in-box formats, with a capacity of 3 liters, are extremely popular. This market also has a minimum shelf life for wines that makes them impossible to be packed in this manner at their source. It is a much preferred packaging version that does not uses glass.Other alternatives used are tetra-packs, pouches and PET containers.

There are many factors that make bulk wine an attractive option. During shipping, for instance, bulk wine has a much better thermal inertia than wine that is packed in glass bottles. Thermal inertia implies keeping the wine at an optimum temperature without exposing the liquid to wide thermal variations. When wine is transported from the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere, the temperatures vary greatly, which can lead to changes in the properties of the wine. Bulk wine is subjected to temperature increases of 10 to 15 degrees celsius, compared to bottled wine which can sometimes exceed variations of 60 degrees celsius. Such significant changes in temperature can last for weeks, till the wine reaches the destination and is placed in adequate conditions.

What are the changes that can occur in wine when it is subjected to higher temperatures than recommended, for several days in a row? The longer the wine is kept under these conditions, the higher are the chances for it to be oxidized. Wine will age in an accelerated fashion, the fruit bouquet will be lost, premature browning can occur, and the levels of sulphur dioxide that protect the wine can decrease considerably.

In this day and age, wine is transported in staggering quantities at once and it is still provided on the market in bulk packages that are not made out of glass. To make wine transportation over large distances efficient, huge cargo containers of approximately 24,000 liters are used.

Spain is the largest producer and seller of bulk wine, followed by France and Italy. The Spanish wine producers managed to export 22.8m hectoliters back in 2014, recording a 22% rise of exported wine over the previous year. France, on the other hand, prefers importing wine more than producing it, purchasing bulk wine from Spain. The French imported no less than 5.8m hectoliters in 2014, which means that they increased importers to 40% more than the previous year. Germany, Portugal, and Russia follow France on the list of most important buyers of Spanish bulk wine.

Spain should look out for Italy, as it is coming strong from behind when it comes to bulk wine. The market it this country in this sector has changed significantly over the past years, in terms of price and final destination market places. In 2015, Italy managed to produce slightly more wine than Spain, recording a harvest of 49 ml. hectoliters, while Spain had just 41. Still, not only the quantity but also the quality of bulk wine coming from Italy helped them gain market. The Italians provided white wines of acceptable quality and red wines of exceptional quality. Other important players in the bulk wine market are Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and California, USA. These last mentioned countries are active in the southern hemisphere of the globe, although their wines can be found all over the world. An increase in the prices of Chilean and Argentinean bulk wine is forecasted, but this may not happen if the producers manage to secure the necessary harvest in the end.

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

New Zealand wine rewarded for Diversity at international competition

New zealand winesResults released today by one of the world’s most prestigious wine competitions are a testament to the rising quality and diversity of New Zealand wines. New Zealand wines beat entries from around the world to win the top Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc Trophies at the 2016 International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC), based in the U.K. This year, New Zealand wines were also awarded Gold Medals for styles ranging from sweet Riesling to Syrah, Gewürztraminer to Malbec.

For another year running, New Zealand retained possession of the Pinot Noir Trophy,awarded in 2016 to the Giesen Single Vineyard Ridge Block Marlborough Pinot Noir 2013. New Zealand also scooped the Sauvignon Blanc Trophy with the Kim Crawford Small Parcels Spitfire Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2016.

New Zealand wine showed it could excel with other styles and varieties on the world-stage by winning top awards for a spectrum of Riesling styles, and a Chardonnay and Gewürztraminer in the whites, and a Syrah, Merlot Cabernet and Malbec in the reds.

“New Zealand has established itself as a world-beater in Sauvignon Blanc, and more recently Pinot Noir,” commented Jo Burzynska, a long time IWSC judge and a New Zealand panel chair. “However, in all the years that I’ve been judging at the IWSC, this is one if the widest range of styles I’ve witnessed winning top awards.”

“We are delighted with the results New Zealand wines achieved at IWSC this year. It’s great see a continued focus on premium Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir, as well recognition of the quality coming from a wide range of other up and coming New Zealand wine styles and varieties.” said Chris Yorke, Global Marketing Director for New Zealand Winegrowers.

For further information please contact:
Chris Yorke
Global Marketing Director
New Zealand Winegrowers
Tel: 09 306 5551
Mob: 021 419194
Email: chris@nzwine.com

Source : NZ wine

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Tesco Strengthens Own Label Wine Range

TescoTesco has boosted its own label range with the introduction of more than 20 new lines under its core and premium finest* wine range – which it says has seen “significant” growth over the summer.

The team has rolled out 39 new wines in total – twenty-two of which are own-label – with a further twelve available exclusively online. The move follows the revamp of 118 wines in its own label range in June, which saw it ditch the “confusing” ‘Vineyards World Wines’ and ‘Simply’ sub-brands, and move six wines previously available under the finest* range to the standard own label.

Tesco BWS team said the its wines has grown 2.9% since the revamp and it had seen a “significant increase” in the number of new customers and returning customers”.

However the move appears contrary to supplier research believed to be presented to the retailer over the summer which suggested Tesco had stripped out too many wines at the premium end during its range review last year, alienating a core section of its 40-something, middle-class customer-base.

The Drink Business team has learnt the retailer had called in suppliers to investigate boosting its £8-20 range bracket to plug the potential gap – but of the new additions to its store-range, only four (including a new finest* English sparkling from producer Hush Heath) retail above £10. Ten will retail on or below £5.50 with a further seven at the £6 – £6.99 ‘sweet spot’ and six retail between £7 – £8.99. A further twelve new wines are available exclusively online, priced from £54 and £120 per case (equivalent to £9-£20 per bottle).

Product development manager Graham Nash said the team’s simplification of the own label range had made it easier for consumers due to clear labeling and pricing. “Evolution is very much to get the own label tiering – [the range] is always evolving to cater for customers’ needs. As lot work done in the last year was in establishing a core range.

Read more at: The Drinks Business

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

10 Innovative Wine Apps and Websites That Can Help You Grow Your Winery Business

The wine industry is finally getting on board with technology and now there are wine apps available that make it easier for brands to cultivate connections, reach customers and gain insights on buying trends- all while promoting their own brand. Tapping into thriving social media communities can help you cultivate those connections by drawing out wine influencers.

Instagram. The premise of this platform is simple: users share images. With over 300 million users there are plenty of well-educated and socially engaged customers. Browsing wine related #hashtags exposes a wide variety of  wine centered photos that even include reviews.

Twitter. The beauty of Twitter is that is allows you to check #hashtags for wine related chats. You can jump in on #SommDay or #ChardonnayDay and engage with an audience that is already interested in what you have to say, and full of wine influencers.

Facebook. While it is more difficult to gain attention using Facebook, you have a platform that allows you to communicate in long-form. It’s an excellent way to cultivate long-term relationships with customers and really engage in interested individuals.

Delectable. Users simply take a picture of their bottle and the app recognizes its produce, name, vintage, and variety. Once your wine has been recognized you can add a review. This review is shared to other users for viewing, commenting and sharing. You can also send your post to the big 3 above. This is where the cool kids hang out, and a lot of winemakers, wine writers and super enthusiasts are found using this app. If you’re new to the app be sure to follow the pros and engage.

Vivino. It’s similar to Delectable, but it reaches a larger, global audience. In addition to the wine reviews, you can view restaurant’s wine lists, too. It has a click to buy feature for every wine and if it isn’t available online it searches locally for pickup. Even the smallest wine brands can achieve great exposure with Vivino.

Cellar Tracker. Manage your own inventory, and see reviews by other users on the wines. You can find out producer, price, region, and even tasting notes.

Cor.kz.  Another inventory tracker that serves as an all in one. You can search via wine name or barcode and tap into reviews. Share your own with fellow users, and social media.

Drync. It was the first app to offer label recognition. Drync users are incredibly loyal, with almost 40% likely to make repeat purchases, with an average basket of over $25. It also offers the option to request wines that are not available on the app.

Next Glass. This app creates a personalized score that is based on each user’s history and their likes and dislikes. It provides recommendations based on that score, and is a more personalized experience for wine lovers.

Spirit of 21. The new kid on the block just launched and already has over 85,000 wine available for quick reference. You can record the aroma, taste and how much you enjoyed the wine and share with fellow users. You can add new wines, too, so if yours isn’t listed, create it! It was only released this month and it’s already making waves.

These websites and wine apps can help wineries promote their own brands as well as use this technology to grow their business. Also read: Tips on how wineries can use social media to grow their business.

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private label wine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Alternate Routes To Grow Your Distribution

One of the greatest challenges for foreign wineries, breweries or spirit brands these days in the U.S. market is to find a point of entry.

Private Label Wine Show - DistributionOne of the greatest challenges for foreign wineries, breweries or spirit brands is to find a point of entry.
Importers are inundated with requests for representation and most brands don’t appear to distinguish themselves from any other unrecognizable brand name. Once an importer takes on your brand it is just the beginning of the journey.
How do you stand out from all the other wines? How do you ensure that one order from the importer turns into two?

The key is often to think outside the box.
In the case of a winery which has a U.S. importer, but is unhappy with the level of sales or simply wants to ensure the relationship continues, opportunity can be found in developing a rapport with a chain. Not the typical chain that readily comes to mind – supermarkets and enormous national accounts with hundreds or thousands of stores. Not only are these almost impossible to penetrate and require an established broker or national distributor to develop the relationship, but they may require more volume than the average winery can provide. Smaller restaurant and retail chains which are theoretically easier to approach may provide all the case movement a winery could wish for.

The importer is providing the basic infrastructure and the wines are warehoused and available in the U.S., allowing a chain to build from one store or a handful, from a few cases to a pallet. Whatever the size, they don’t normally start with a container order unless they have made a commitment to a very inexpensive brand with a national distribution network. Container orders can come, even for small or higher priced wines, but taking a chance on wines that are already in the country is a much more feasible option.

If you haven’t already met buyers on sales calls around the country, start by asking the importer for any distributor’s placements that are part of a chain. It may just be one wine in one city at the moment, but if it is Fleming’s restaurant, a Whole Foods specialty grocery store or a Costco, this opens up opportunities for other areas. Cultivate the buyer, ask how you can expand on distribution in theirs or other areas, and capitalize on healthy sales already in place by speaking with regional buyers. Offer to give volume discounts, do wine dinners, in-store tastings or ask for a meeting with store managers.

If you have lost an importer, the knowledge of these placements can mean the opportunity to get back into the country through a chain, rather than starting the whole process all over again of contacting importers who may or may not have any interest.

There are advantages you need to leverage:
– The brand needs to built up a loyal consumer base across the country that the chain can supply through direct shipping;

– The chain should be a multi-million dollar business that pays on time every time;

– The chain should work with a local importer/distributor that clears their products for them for a reduced fee, thus allowing the retailer to make significantly more on the sale and encourages them to continue promoting the brand.

Some disadvantages could be:
– All their eggs are in one basket. In the event anything changes with the chain they could lose all U.S. distribution;

– They have no control over sales and which wines are sold, which could conflict with which wines they produce of the greatest volume;

– Distribution is limited to one state and at the off-premise retail level.

Consider other ways in which you can “think outside the box” when looking at back door distribution and approaching potential customers:
Do you have a particularly popular wine of the moment, such as Moscato or a sweet red at a good price point? Could you produce one for this market?

Are these wines of considerable cachet elsewhere and highly rated?

Did you develop relationships with any particular distributors in the old importer network and can approach them for either an importer recommendation, or ask if they are interested in bringing them in themselves?

Do you have any special connections, or wines suited to wine clubs, military bases or other potentially large buyers of wine?

Could you offer exclusive arrangements based on either limited availability of your wine or providing a specialty label for them?

Often it means starting small and it always means being tenacious, focused, consistent and working hard, but the rewards of being creative in this market are often worth it. More tips on how you can grow your Business

Article Source: BTN Academy 

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private labelwine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

ibwsshow offer January

Private Label Strategy To Grow Your Own Sales

private-labelWhat are the main reasons that your brewery, distillery, or winery should go the Private Label route to build your business? With continual growth across almost every category, the market is continually shifting to service the needs of new consumers and evolving trends.

This article is designed to offer several unique ways that certain Breweries (Craft Spirits and Wineries) can build high-performing brands for producers who want to fill a specific need in the marketplace.

There are eight steps that most brand owners review when going into the “Private Label” beer, wine and/or spirits business:

1.) Branding/Concept development—sourcing the customer with the need

2.) Researching and analyzing the concept

3.) Logo, Design and Prototype development

4.) Product Formulations, Flavor Development and Quality Assurance

5.) Business and Management Services
(Licensing, TTB Label Approvals,FDA Label Compliance, & Trademarking)

6.) Packaging/SKU Development

7.) Warehousing and Logistics

8.) Sales, Marketing and Distribution Support

There are many off-shoots of breweries and packaging facilities that offer their services to put private label beverages on the map. Some of them are set up strictly for producing blended beverages and/or carbonated soft drinks. Many produce bottled waters, fruit juices and energy drinks as well.

But the expansion and upgrading of old line breweries and packaging facilities, plus the addition of new business models in both the retail chain arena and craft beer hotbed, have developed some unique “one stop shops” for growing private label brands to gain access to these growing beer, wine and spirits markets—here are just a few:

Monarch Customer Beverages—Cold Spring, MN

Billed as a “Your single source solution for private label beverages and contract manufacturing.” Services provided include:
1.) Custom product, flavor and label development
(beer, energy drinks,CSD’s, and bottled water)

2.) Trademark searches

3.) Raw materials sourcing
(bottles, cans, labels, boxes, trays, ingredients)

4.) Bottling and packaging services
(glass, cans, multi-packs, PET, aluminum bottles)

5.) Production management
(scheduling, bottling, lab testing, analysis)

6.) Logistics, warehousing and distribution

U.S. Beverage Manufacturing—San Louis Obispo, CA

Billed as “Your Beverage Turnkey Solution.” Development Services they provide include:

1.) Personalized beverage development
(alcoholic bevs, coffee/teas, energy drinks/shots, kids drinks, CSD’s, Lemonade, sports drinks, and waters)

2.) Beverage packaging and label design
(Cans, bottles, bag-in-the-box,canisters, cartons, gift packs, PET, pouches, stick packs, tetra packs,tubes & hot bottles).

3.) Legal Services
(Licensing, Compliance, Trademarks and Brand Registration)

4.) Creative design and website services
(label, website and package design)

5.) Sales and Marketing
(distributor network, brokers, and retail chains)

6.) products, sauces and marinades, soups & vegetables, waters, energy beverages, and wines & spirits

City Brewery—La Crosse, WI

Billed as the “Premier Contract Beverage Producer” With State-of-the Art Plants in La Crosse, Latrobe, PA and Memphis, TN City Brewery’s professional services include:

1.) Unique beverage mix with beer, flavored malt beverages, energy drinks, teas and alcoholic cider.

2.) Brewing and aging cellars

3.) Blending and batching for FMB’s and beverages

4.) Packaging and unique configurations
(Bottles, cans, kegs, multi-packs, rainbow variety packs, cold fill, hot fill and shrink wrap capability)

5.) Quality assurance
(Analytical lab, package lab, micro lab, plant sanitation, data reporting, sample library, and CIP validation)

6.) Warehousing and logistics
(warehousing, logistics, transport, refrigeration/cooler space, rail car loading capability, and inventory)

7.) National footprint with three production facilities

Winery Exchange—Novato, CA

“Building Brands Worldwide” is their calling card. Winery Exchange professional services originate from their strong retail connections, including:

1.) Private label branding for Worldwide retailers
(Clients have included Kroger, Costco, Delhaize Group, Tesco, Fresh & Easy, Cost Plus, Whole Foods, H-E-B & Salisbury)

2.) Research
(Closely follow consumer trends in product categories, target pricing, and impactful packaging and l levels of brand support required to break through to consumers).

3.) Brand concept development
(Designs are presented to retailers based on research provided)

4.) Packaging Implementation
(Logistics, customer service, and distributor teams work with brand marketing to implement a new product)

5.) Marketing Programs
(Calendars are provided to gain displays, creative POS, in-store demos, and PR/press coverage)

6.) Winery Exchange uses Production facilities like City Brewery to bring their product to market.

BrewHub LLC—St. Louis, MO

“Today’s beverage landscape is changing”—a new concept in Craft Brewing, BrewHub is building 5 Craft Breweries of similar size at 75,000 barrels each in sunbelt and high growth craft beer areas. Their services are similar to the others, but have some significant differences, due to craft brewing methodology:

1.) Partner Brewing (50,000 sq ft facility, 75,000 barrels of available capacity, state-of-the-art brewing, packaging and warehousing set up fro small batches, flexibility to brew, package and co-pack multiple brands, tasting room fro clients to use with distributor/retail partners, and easy access for full goods transportation).

2.) Facility & Operations
(Fermentation, Brewing Options, Packaging Options, Refrigerated Storage, Central Distribution).

3.) Brewing Services & Options
(Ingredients, Batch sizes, mashing strategies, aging, custom hopping schemes, finishing and pasteurization).

4.) Laboratory Services
(Physical Analysis, Microbiological Analysis, Chemical Analysis).

5.) Sales and Distribution Services
(Distributor Agreements, Distributor and Retail Relationships, Inventory
Control and Rotation, Sales Training and Support, Sales Reporting Category Management, Pricing Strategy, Sales Incentives and Competitive Analysis).

6.) Marketing
(Market/Consumer Research, Brand Building, Labels/Packaging, POS, Sales Promotions, Special Events, Sponsorships, Media Plans, Public Relations).

7.) Export Opportunities
(international Contacts, Logistics, Legal Services, and Co-Packing).

Summary:
Market dynamics are constantly changing everywhere around us. Craft breweries are being built at a pace of three per day!!

The landscape of freight and logistics is scary due to high fuel prices, independent trucker declines and lack of suitable rail car services in smaller cities. The Craft Beer, Artisan Wine, and yet Craft Spirits Markets couldn’t be stronger and yet they compete in a very difficult economic environment. Growth continues as the consumer looks for “higher quality and better tasting, at the expense of less volume.”

The Beverage Companies listed above are all after another expanding segment in the U.S.—private label and contract beverages for the consumer looking for variety and good tasting brands at favorable prices. Private labels are being requested by retailers in today’s market – and not the plain old generic white beer cans.

The graphics are impactful, have appetite appeal, are eye-catching and taste great because of quality control and improved customer service by the larger players and focused companies. If you want a large size bottle with a diamond shaped label, in a 9 pack box, with varnish for consumer reaction, foil neck over wax and bottle conditioned product, there is a co-packer ready to that for you in every part of the U.S. today. Your “one stop shop” is a good way to pad your bottom line with custom orders.
As per the examples above, there are many ways to grow your company through innovative approaches to the market. It is important to study the market and identify any possible opportunities that can possible maximize your profits without putting you over your capacity.

Article source: BTN Academy

If you are a winery looking to grow contract wine manufacturing or private label wine services, we encourage you to exhibit at IBWSS and join the largest gathering of private labelwine professionals in the USA.

Only 20 Spots are left to become an Exhibitor at the 2017 International Bulk Wine and Spirits Show. Register Now and Join the show as an Exhibitor.

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